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6 results for Aquatic habitats
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Record #:
17723
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Pamlico Sound, the largest body of water in the four distinct coastal regions of North Carolina, is known as the fishing gem of the state. As a prime habitat for numerous aquatic animals and vegetation, the Pamlico Sound is a strategic habitat area for the North Carolina Coastal Habitat Protection Plan.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 3, Summer 2012, p12-17, map, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
30080
Abstract:
The genus Necturus is a group of aquatic salamanders commonly known as waterdogs and mudpuppies. Of the three species occurring in North Carolina, only the Neuse River Waterdog (Necturus lewisi) is endemic to the state. In 1978, a three-year study began to provide information on its life history, habitat preference, and preliminary conservation status.
Source:
Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 10, Feb 1985, p1-12, bibl Periodical Website
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Record #:
30084
Abstract:
The Neuse River Waterdog (Necturus lewisi) is a large, aquatic salamander endemic to the Neuse and Tar River systems of North Carolina. Some of the streams inhabited by the salamander drain lands subject to frequent pesticide applications. This paper reports the results of analysis of tissues to determine pesticide and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) residue levels.
Source:
Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 10, Feb 1985, p107-109, bibl Periodical Website
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Record #:
30083
Author(s):
Abstract:
Movements, microhabitat selection and home ranges of the Neuse River Waterdog (Necturus lewisi) were studied in the Little River, Wake and Johnston counties, North Carolina, from 1977 to 1981. The study provides information on the animal’s behavior in both its natural environment and the laboratory.
Source:
Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 10, Feb 1985, p83-106, il, bibl Periodical Website
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Record #:
30988
Author(s):
Abstract:
Farm ponds are one of North Carolina’s most valuable aquatic resources. A pond can serve as a water source for livestock, aid in fire protection, attract wildlife, and provide fishing opportunities. This article describes popular fish species, such as largemouth bass, bluegill, and channel catfish, and discusses fishing techniques and etiquette.
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Record #:
33407
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Division of Environmental Management recently studied the toxicity of selenium in freshwater. Selenium was a priority review because the decline of fish populations in Hyco and Belews Lakes had been associated with the chemical. The study confirms that the present selenium criteria are adequate to protect freshwater aquatic life.