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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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9 results for Honey
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Record #:
3391
Abstract:
Honey has been a popular sweetener since ancient times. Many varieties are made in the state, but the three sold most often are sourwood, gallberry, and tulip poplar. The valued honeybee was named official state insect in 1974.
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Record #:
24850
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Skip and Sandy Abrams own Magnolia House Honey in Jackson, North Carolina. They started the business in the fall of 2014 and have had huge success. Their honey ranges in color and includes varieties from New York, Florida, and North Carolina. They discuss the struggles of beekeeping and where different forms of honey come from.
Record #:
26734
Abstract:
Bee Charmer is a honey tasting bar located in the heart of downtown Asheville that boasts a wide variety of honeys from all around the world. Very similar to a wine tasting bar, Bee Charmer has honeys from Italy, France, and other countries.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 84 Issue 3, August 2016, p110-112, 114, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
26733
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North Carolina has more beekeepers than any state in the country. The state offers a variety of flavors of honey based on the regional plants. In particular, the sourwood variety of the mountains and foothills of North Carolina is one of the most treasured flavors of honey in the world.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 84 Issue 3, August 2016, p104-106, 108, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
29852
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Thanks to campaigns aimed at reversing ebbs in pollinator numbers, honey bees have lost their edge. Beekeeper Sean Collinsworth discusses the sophisticated and efficient ways in which bees communicate and behave. Collinsworth has forty hives from which he makes several varieties of honey for his business, KillerBeesHoney.com.
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Record #:
31037
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New whole grain wheat wafers have been developed for fall out shelters, while tax payers will receive some relief from a new wheat program available to farmers in 1962, along with a bigger wheat income forecasted for over $8 million. Additionally, a new method of harvesting honey has been developed, while tobacco has been described as the most suited crop for mechanical harvesting.
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Record #:
34436
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John Herbert Caudle discovered raw honey as a way to cope with the effects of his cancer treatments. Caudle’s business, Herb’s Honey, produces raw honey, which is not heated or mixed with corn syrup, like most processed honeys are. Caudle became interested in beekeeping after learning about raw honey’s health benefits, including wound treatment, allergy and sore throat relief, and skin-clearing properties.
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Record #:
36848
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Charles Heatherly became a beekeeper when his source for his favorite type of honey was no longer available. In this interview, he explains the workings of bee culture, and how to harvest honey and cultivate their natural resources. “Stella Daniel’s Orange Carrot Cake” recipe is included at the end of the article.
Record #:
36589
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Sharing genetic material with the Scutellata, the bees Sean Collingsworth keeps are the Italian and Carniolan varieties. His relatively harmless hive dwellers, supping on nectar untainted by pesticides, produce what he touted as honey high in quality because of its purity.