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9 results for Groundwater--Pollution
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Record #:
25610
Author(s):
Abstract:
In Scotland County, overused and abandoned underground gas tanks have been leaking gasoline into the groundwater. Officials found that wells serving 60 families – nearly every household in the county -- were tainted with unsafe levels of ethylene dibromide.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 3 Issue 3, February 15-28 1985, p1, 4-5, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
28237
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hog lagoons or cesspools are the disposal method of waste in the hog industry. However, after 2005, there were no supposed to be any more lagoons in use in the state. The lagoons contaminate groundwater and nearby watersheds and Governor Easely made a deal with industry to do away with the lagoons for a better environmentally and economically feasible method. To date, there has not been an agreed-upon economically feasible method, but some are hoping that research will produce one soon.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 14, April 2007, p23 Periodical Website
Record #:
33578
Author(s):
Abstract:
Scientists at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill have been conducting laboratory research on pollutant biodegradation in subsurface soils for several years. They are investigating aquifer contamination in eastern North Carolina, and testing biotechnology for cleaning up groundwater pollution.
Record #:
34118
Author(s):
Abstract:
The United States Geological Survey’s fourth National Water Summary released in October indicates that the overall quality of the nation’s groundwater is good, but management and protection of groundwater resources remain major challenges. In North Carolina, the most common naturally occurring groundwater quality problem is the presence of saltwater in all aquifers in the eastern region. Contamination from landfills, waste lagoons, underground storage tanks, and accidental chemical spills also contribute to water quality problems.
Record #:
34245
Author(s):
Abstract:
A federal appeals court decision in a groundwater contamination lawsuit expected to have broad implications for toxic tort actions in North Carolina has turned out to be something of a legal curiosity, according to attorney Craig Bromby of Hunton & Williams. The case of Carroll versus Litton Systems, Inc. pertained to whether any amount of chemical contaminant moving from one person’s property into another person’s groundwater constitutes a legal trespass and whether a company is liable for increased risk of disease. However, the ruling’s opinion is unpublished and citation is limited.
Record #:
34258
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Pesticide Board has approved and released its “Interagency Study of the Impact of Pesticide Use on Ground Water in North Carolina”. The study was initiated in 1987 to determine if labeled uses of pesticide products are impacting the groundwater resources in the state. A summary of the results from monitoring wells are provided in this article.
Record #:
34306
Author(s):
Abstract:
In February 2000, the North Carolina Environmental Management Commission’s Groundwater Committee revisited a proposal to adopt a temporary rule lowering the groundwater standard for arsenic. The proposal addresses groundwater contaminants which could affect the quality of drinking water and impose health risks. Currently, private wells are not subject to drinking water standards or routinely tested for contamination.
Record #:
34333
Author(s):
Abstract:
A pending change in Natural Resources Conservation Service standards for designing nutrient management plans for animal waste operations could force some animal producers in North Carolina to look for additional land on which to apply wastes. The unfavorable nitrogen-to-phosphorus ratio in manures has often resulted in an overapplication of phosphorus, which can further dissolve in soil water and seep into groundwater. North Carolina is identifying soil sites with high potential for phosphorus loss.
Record #:
34331
Author(s):
Abstract:
Much of groundwater contamination is contamination of aquifer soils by dense compounds that are not soluble in water. Among the nation’s leading scientists focusing on contaminant remediation are those in the Center for Multiphase Research in the Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering at University of North Carolina Chapel Hill. They have a strategy for cleaning up dense contaminants that involves floating pools by increasing the density of the underlying groundwater.