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16 results for Soil science
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Record #:
3495
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Abstract:
Effective January 1, 1997, the N.C. Soil Scientist Licensing Act makes it a misdemeanor to practice soil science or use the title of soil scientist without a license. The measure seeks to insure accountability and integrity of the profession.
Record #:
23983
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The author presents various microorganisms found in soil that help nurture plants and how to keep soil full of microorganisms all year round.
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Record #:
25135
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With soil erosion becoming a big problem, new ideas on how to prevent and stop it are discussed. In addition, the problems caused by this erosion are outlined and explained.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 4 Issue 3, Spring 1985, p1, 6, il
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Record #:
26673
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Cheryl Webb of Statesville, North Carolina is the junior high school student winner for the best essay on the Wildlife Week Theme of the Year. In her essay, she discussed the implications of soil erosion to farmers and the importance of soil conservation.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 32 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1985, p5, il
Record #:
26884
Author(s):
Abstract:
A nationwide survey conducted by the U.S. Department of Agriculture found that soil erosion is twenty-five percent worse than during the Dust Bowl of the 1930s. Soil scientists agree that the future of our farming industry is threatened by rapid loss of topsoil. Erosion not only reduces soil productivity, it also contributes to air and water pollution.
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Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 29 Issue 2, Feb 1982, p10-11, il
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Record #:
31503
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Abstract:
North Carolina soil conservation specialists are currently involved in a project offering assistance, support, and encouragement to help farmers in Ecuador address that country’s severe soil erosion problems. Jesse L. Hicks and other soil conservationists went to Ecuador to make recommendations and initiate development of a national soil conservation program. Ecuadorians also came to North Carolina for specialized training.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 13 Issue 1, Jan 1981, p18-19, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
32054
Author(s):
Abstract:
Families can lose substantial amounts of money and suffer many inconveniences because they are selecting poor homesites. In this article, soil scientists from North Carolina State University discuss the diversity of soil types found in the state and characteristics of suitable sites for land development.
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Record #:
34158
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Abstract:
The City of Raleigh is supporting a research team led by Dr. Larry King of North Carolina State University in a study of the soil properties of its sludge-treated fields, the composition of the crops grown there, and groundwater quality with attention to nitrates. The city plans to compost sludge to produce a product that can be used by the Raleigh Parks and Recreation Department in its landscaping program and be made available to farmers for use on specified crops.
Record #:
34312
Author(s):
Abstract:
Concerns about the impact of human settlements on the available land suitable for agriculture have been rising rapidly during recent years. A study by the Pennsylvania State University Office for Remote Sensing of Earth Resources determined the extent and geographic distribution of soil productivity for land presently under urbanization in the contiguous United States. Specific results for North Carolina are provided in this article, and show the status of soil resources in relation to urbanization.
Record #:
34333
Author(s):
Abstract:
A pending change in Natural Resources Conservation Service standards for designing nutrient management plans for animal waste operations could force some animal producers in North Carolina to look for additional land on which to apply wastes. The unfavorable nitrogen-to-phosphorus ratio in manures has often resulted in an overapplication of phosphorus, which can further dissolve in soil water and seep into groundwater. North Carolina is identifying soil sites with high potential for phosphorus loss.
Record #:
34816
Author(s):
Abstract:
The State of North Carolina has three broad provinces with different soil characteristics—Blue Ridge, Piedmont, and the Coastal Plain. The Blue Ridge area is predominantly metamorphic rock while the Piedmont and Coastal Plain have a clay and sand mixture. Of these two materials, clay is the most difficult to work with. Despite its ability to hold water, clay’s clingy nature can be damaging to plants. The author recommends adding gypsum or compost to clay and silty soils.
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Carolina Gardener (NoCar SB 453.2 N8 C37), Vol. 28 Issue 2, March 2016, p17-20, il, map Periodical Website
Record #:
35205
Abstract:
An examination of the region’s geographical aspects that encouraged the archaeological developments of residing Native Americans intended to interpret the sedimentary processes of the Holocene and Pleistocene periods. Methods utilized included aerial photographs, soil profiles, and sediment sampling. Conclusions derived: a cultural horizon buried in an Aeolian deposit; shallow and deeper deposits in the excavation sites; sediment erosion on the southwest slope and buildup on the northeastern slope; thicker post-aeolian deposits on the northeastern slope; porous sand and gravel suggesting Native American occupancy. From these conclusions, the author suggested that this model can be used for future Coastal Plain soil studies.
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Record #:
35431
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Abstract:
Highlighted in Tammy Stern’s article that proves soil’s importance is the abundance of creatures that call it home (one quarter of the earth’s animal inhabitants) and the types of soil that support plant life. In fact, the importance of soil was recognized in the traveling exhibition, “Get Soiled: Visit Dig It”! that opened at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Science in May 2015.
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Record #:
36193
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Abstract:
The cover alluded to is mulch, produced naturally to promote wild plant growth. Materials recommended for creating mulch are wood bark/chips, leaves, and straw or hay. Additional incentive to use mulch in gardens were the downside of not having mulch as a natural protectant for plants.
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Record #:
36196
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Abstract:
The particular type of worm discussed, compost, can create compost through a process known as vermiculture. Encouraging gardeners to keep organic waste from landfills is its five benefits: increasing water holding capacity and porosity; improving texture; reducing erosion; and impact on plant growth and yields. Additional incentive to engage in vermiculture is this EPA’s statistic: between 55-65% of residential waste is thrown away, much of which is organic.
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