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14 results for Erosion
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Record #:
489
Author(s):
Abstract:
Wilms discusses the potential effects of sea-level rise on coastal North Carolina, and the relevant North Carolina policy for this contingency.
Source:
Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 16 Issue 2, Fall 1990, p44-50, il, map, bibl, f
Full Text:
Record #:
501
Abstract:
Most urban construction sites are falling short of state goals to curb urban erosion; policy designed to remedy these shortcomings is being debated.
Source:
Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 16 Issue 2, Fall 1990, p28-36, il, map, bibl, f
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Record #:
5778
Abstract:
There are 4,000 miles of estuarine shoreline in the state. Over the past twenty years, homesites, construction, and farming have increased along it, prompting concern about water quality, wildlife habitats, and erosion. The Division of Coastal Management is reviewing building regulations of the past decades to determine if revising them would alleviate these problems.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Winter 1999, p24-27, il Periodical Website
Record #:
6726
Author(s):
Abstract:
Sediment is the number one pollution concern across North Carolina. It is the largest nonpoint-source pollutant in the state and one of the main reasons surface water quality has deteriorated. Lane discusses causes of sedimentation and what can be done to prevent or alleviate it.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 23 Issue 2, Spring 2004, p1-2, il
Record #:
19363
Author(s):
Abstract:
Eroding soil from eastern North Carolina into the coastal plain has been a major focus of recent geographical studies. This case study looks at drainage ditch excavations in Pitt County over a one year period. Analysis of soil accumulation in these ditches reveals the type of soil erosion from eastern North Carolina's agricultural lands and the extent to which these soils travel towards the coastal regions.
Source:
North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 8 Issue , 2000, p55-63, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
25253
Author(s):
Abstract:
A workshop on shoreline erosion presents a new winning way to control erosion in the form of riprap which is varying sized stones either natural or cement-type.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 21 Issue 2, Spring 2002, p2, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
25957
Author(s):
Abstract:
Miles of east coast beaches are at a serious threat to erosion, which in turn threatens property owners, tourism, and habitat. Although there are several methods for stopping erosion, the constant, complex processes of energy produce a relentless pressure on the coastline. Simpson argues that solutions may lie in good flood plain and coastal zone planning.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 18 Issue 3, Summer 1974, p11
Subject(s):
Record #:
26884
Author(s):
Abstract:
A nationwide survey conducted by the U.S. Department of Agriculture found that soil erosion is twenty-five percent worse than during the Dust Bowl of the 1930s. Soil scientists agree that the future of our farming industry is threatened by rapid loss of topsoil. Erosion not only reduces soil productivity, it also contributes to air and water pollution.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 29 Issue 2, Feb 1982, p10-11, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
31554
Abstract:
The Qualla Housing Authority is planning to carve and build new brick dwellings for the Eastern Band of the Cherokee Indians directly within the mountains of Western North Carolina, but various soil conservation problems are associated with such a project. The Soil Conservation Service recommended to use a high-pressure hydroseeder to plant grass, prevent erosion and maintain a foundation.
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Record #:
31586
Author(s):
Abstract:
Surface mining can create severe erosion and environmental problems. With five mining companies extracting feldspar and mica from the mountainous soil, Mitchell County sought assistance from soil conservationists to address spreading erosion and land damage. Land restoration efforts are underway and incorporating scientific techniques and materials to return the topography to a natural balance.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 9 Issue 1, Jan 1977, p16-17, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
31669
Author(s):
Abstract:
The 1973 General Assembly adopted a Sedimentation Pollution Act to deal with the problem of sediment run-off from erosion of land during construction operations. Governor Jim Holshouser discusses the problem of uncontrolled soil erosion, improper use of farmlands, and the new sedimentation law.
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Record #:
34262
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina is widely acknowledged to have one of the nation’s best regulatory programs to prevent environmental damage from erosion and sedimentation leaving construction sites. However, as the state rapidly grows, the program needs to be improved by tighter standards, more aggressive enforcement, more technical assistance, and an infusion of resources. The Sediment Control Commission is reviewing standards and evaluating program needs in preparation for the next legislative session.
Record #:
34264
Author(s):
Abstract:
After runoff from construction sites and other disturbed sites in the Research Triangle area turned the troubled Neuse River red and grabbed newspaper headlines in June, Governor James B. Hunt, Jr. set in motion a series of events that led to recommendations for improving North Carolina’s Erosion and Sedimentation Control Program. Among the recommendations are changes for self-monitoring and recordkeeping, site risk assessment, and a rapid response team.
Record #:
36576
Author(s):
Abstract:
Mounds built by Native Americans, like the ones featured in the accompanying photo, had purposes both prosaic and sacred. Places like Franklin, Bryson City, Murphy have earthen mounds intact, despite the effects of erosion, plowing, and artifact hunters.