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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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101 results for North Carolina Geographer
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Record #:
16824
Abstract:
The HIV syndrome and the AIDS epidemic will be around for a long time. While many Americans feel it is mainly found in the gay population, the epidemic has now spread through all levels of our society. Disadvantaged populations, who have greater health and medical problems, and also less access to medical care, are more at risk of the disease. The authors give an analysis of the geographical spread of AIDS in NC, which began in the late 1980s, and focus on the linkage between the disease and social deprivation.
Source:
North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 1 Issue , Summer 1992, p1-10, il, map, bibl
Record #:
16825
Abstract:
A geography field trip is a first-hand encounter, after library research and statistical inquiry, with the complex linkage between the activities and artifacts of people and the physical environment--topography, drainage, weather/climate, and vegetation. The Haw River Basin was selected for this trip because of its long association with one of the Piedmont's prominent economic drivers, the cotton textile industry.
Source:
North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 1 Issue , Summer 1992, p11-24, il, map, bibl
Record #:
16826
Author(s):
Abstract:
The fastest growing segment of the American population is the elderly, and as many of them retire, they seek warmer climates. A number have relocated to NC over the last two decades, especially in Carteret and Brunswick counties. Bennett examines the characteristics of the retirees coming to these two counties, the areas they left and the reasons they chose NC, their economic and environmental impact on the two counties, and any concerns the retirees have.
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North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 1 Issue , Summer 1992, p25-38, il, map, bibl
Subject(s):
Record #:
16827
Author(s):
Abstract:
Communities large or small deal with environmental issues every day. They are an integral part of land use planning, and how well planners and community officials resolve or mitigate them determines how land will be used. Cooper describes an approach to planning that integrates environmental considerations into the land use decision-making process.
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North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 1 Issue , Summer 1992, p39-45, il, bibl
Record #:
16883
Author(s):
Abstract:
Knowledge of storm and erosion hazard zones along barrier islands is crucial for public safety and informed land use. In this study hazardous areas along the Outer Banks which have been identified by earth scientists in the literature of coastal zone management are compared with native folk perceptions. Long-term residents who have observed several decades of environmental change can complement scientific delimination of hazard zones.
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North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 2 Issue , Summer 1993, p1-11, map, bibl
Subject(s):
Record #:
16881
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina General Assembly passed legislation during the 1989 session that entrusted the regulation of minimal environmental standards of watersheds to local governments. The goal of this legislation is to protect surface water supplies from pollution by managing development densities, allowable land use, industrial and residential discharge, and chemical qualities of the water. Since adoption of this legislation, many local governments are turning to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for watershed identification and management.
Source:
North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 1 Issue , Summer 1992, p66-67, f
Record #:
16878
Author(s):
Abstract:
Economic Development has largely bypassed much of the rural coastal plain of southeastern North Carolina. Few industries requiring skilled workers and paying high wages have been attracted to the region. To increase development in this region, it is imperative that new economic activities be put in place. These activities must be compatible with the natural and cultural resources of the region. One such activity that many believe has significant potential to enhance economic development is aquaculture, especially catfish farming.
Source:
North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 1 Issue , Summer 1992, p55-61, bibl
Record #:
16884
Abstract:
According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), nonpoint sources of water pollution (i.e., agriculture, urban runoff, mining, forestry, and construction) are among the leading causes of decreased water quality in the United States. The State of North Carolina recently promulgated stringent regulations governing land use in watersheds and are effectively using GIS as a system for hydraulic models to reinforce new legislation.
Source:
North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 2 Issue , Summer 1993, p12-20, bibl, f
Record #:
16880
Abstract:
Imperatore and Wilms discuss North Carolina's involvement as a member of the National Geographic Society's Geographic Education Alliance Network, first designated and coordinated in 1986 by faculty from Appalachian State and East Carolina University to begin various activities to enhance and promote geography instruction.
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Record #:
16891
Abstract:
In spite of progress controlling discharges of industrial pollutants, many urban drainage basins continue to suffer from heavy loads of sediment and pollutants. City governments and local environmental groups are attempting to restore natural vitality to such streams and wetlands through cooperative integrated efforts to reduce storm water borne pollution. This article discusses the parallel histories of stream greenway rehabilitation and storm water management and describes the ongoing process of merging the two goals in a southern Piedmont context--Greensboro's Lake Daniel Project.
Source:
North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 3 Issue , Summer 1994, p17-29, map, bibl, f
Record #:
16890
Abstract:
Most people would correctly guess that Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (RMSF) originated somewhere in the Rocky Mountain region of the U.S. Even geographers, however, might be surprised to learn that the disease has long been insignificant in its region of origin, yet is increasingly prevalent in the southeast, particularly in North Carolina. This article examines the disease from a geographic perspective, looking at its history, cultural ecology, prevalence in North Carolina, and possible intervention.
Source:
North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 3 Issue , Summer 1994, p1-16, map, bibl, f
Record #:
16892
Author(s):
Abstract:
Albert discusses changing patterns of physician office locations in Asheville from a land-use context. In 1948, a thriving medical district existed within the central business district of Asheville, but in 1991, just a handful of physicians remained in this area. This article is concerned with the temporal and spatial sequences of this shift, and the role of land use planning on evolving patterns of medical land use.
Source:
North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 3 Issue , Summer 1994, p31-46, map, bibl
Record #:
16889
Author(s):
Abstract:
Geographic information is increasingly being used as a decision support tool in both public and private sector organizations. The North Carolina Center for Geographic Information and Analysis (CGIA) is an agency in the Office of State Planning. Established in 1977 as part of the Land Policy Act, CGIA implemented one of the first fully operational state geographic information systems in the country.
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Record #:
16893
Author(s):
Abstract:
In addition to the natural forces at work on coastlines there is change being brought about by increasing populations. Where rates of development are rapid, we find that map revisions cannot keep pace and therefore we must rely on other information sources. Standard vertical aerial photography can provide very complete information about structures, vegetation, and coastal morphology.
Source:
North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 3 Issue , Summer 1994, p57-67, f
Subject(s):
Record #:
16885
Author(s):
Abstract:
One of the major geographical characteristics of precipitation is its spatial pattern. many studies have described and explained the spatial variation of monthly and annual precipitation totals in various regions, but much less is known about the pattern of precipitation on the daily time scale. Robinson discusses this in terms of North Carolina.
Source:
North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 2 Issue , Summer 1993, p21-31, map, bibl, f