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24 results for Watershed--Protection
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Record #:
16881
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina General Assembly passed legislation during the 1989 session that entrusted the regulation of minimal environmental standards of watersheds to local governments. The goal of this legislation is to protect surface water supplies from pollution by managing development densities, allowable land use, industrial and residential discharge, and chemical qualities of the water. Since adoption of this legislation, many local governments are turning to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for watershed identification and management.
Source:
North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 1 Issue , Summer 1992, p66-67, f
Record #:
25274
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Center for Watershed Protection has come up with a review of urban stream research discussing the studies measuring indicators all over the U.S. and gives directions for research on urban streams.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 22 Issue 2, Spring 2003, p7
Record #:
25276
Author(s):
Abstract:
There are many concerns involving the potential move of Rose Acre Farms to a location withing Pocosin Lakes National Wildlife Refuge and near the Alligator River, Swan Quarter and Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuge.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 22 Issue 4, Fall 2003, p5
Record #:
27565
Author(s):
Abstract:
Jim Clark is the president of Save the Water, a Durham-based coalition of conservationists. Clark and the group are lobbying for watershed protection measures in the Triangle area. The area water supply is polluted and at further risk due to booming growth in the area. Clark proposed the “Triangle Express,” a light-rail system, that would be less harmful to the area watershed than the proposed highway thoroughfare plan that would send roads and spur growth in the Falls Lake watershed area.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 7 Issue 37, November 16-22 1989, p9 Periodical Website
Record #:
28237
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hog lagoons or cesspools are the disposal method of waste in the hog industry. However, after 2005, there were no supposed to be any more lagoons in use in the state. The lagoons contaminate groundwater and nearby watersheds and Governor Easely made a deal with industry to do away with the lagoons for a better environmentally and economically feasible method. To date, there has not been an agreed-upon economically feasible method, but some are hoping that research will produce one soon.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 14, April 2007, p23 Periodical Website
Record #:
33347
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1983 the North Carolina Department of Natural Resources and Community Development launched a new program called Stream Watch. The program aims to encourage citizens’ awareness of watersheds and water resource management, and to establish a partnership among citizens, industries, and state and local governments. Over the past three years, a strong network of diverse groups has been active in the conservation of North Carolina’s major river basins.
Record #:
33355
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Soil and Water Conservation Commission has unanimously approved a resolution calling for expansion of the North Carolina Agriculture Cost Share Program addressing water management, soil resource protection, and waste management. The resolution is based on a study which indicated that water quality in the coastal counties represented one of the most critical needs.
Record #:
33493
Author(s):
Abstract:
Legislation was introduced in the North Carolina General Assembly to establish a commission to study the issue of watershed protection standards. The bill was prompted by concerns among Raleigh city officials about pollution threats to Falls Lake, the main source of drinking water for Raleigh and much of Wake County. The proposed commission would investigate the need for watershed development standards beyond a local basis.
Record #:
33582
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina communities are acting to protect the streams and reservoirs they rely on for drinking water by requesting reclassification of their water supplies under the North Carolina Water Supply Protection Program. The new system has three water supply classes defined by the amount and types of permitted wastewater discharges and requirements for nonpoint source controls in the watershed. Various departments of State government are offering technical assistance, and land use and economic information.
Record #:
33581
Author(s):
Abstract:
A study of water quality problems in the nation’s streams and rivers has revealed that the worst problems are caused by nonpoint source pollution. In response, the Environmental Protection Agency shifted responsibility for pollution control from federal to state programs. North Carolina has already made substantial progress in assessing water pollution problems, and is soliciting public comments on watershed priorities.
Record #:
34116
Author(s):
Abstract:
State government in North Carolina has been helping localities protect their water supplies since 1888 when Raleigh enacted special legislation for the protection of Walnut Creek watershed. Since then, water treatment technology has improved water purification but more efforts are needed to protect undeveloped watersheds under multiple jurisdictions. This article provides recommendations for legislative and executive actions to watershed protection.
Record #:
34143
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Legislative Research Commission’s Committee on Watershed Protection has recommended to the 1989 General Assembly two bills aimed at providing reliable and safe water supplies. The bills outline standards for point and nonpoint pollution controls and propose the development of a state water supply plan.
Record #:
34146
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Department of Natural Resources and Community Development may be scheduling public hearings on surface water reclassification requests in the first half of 1989. Some communities have requested a more protective classification of existing water supplies. Others have asked that surface waters now classified for recreation, trout, or other uses be reclassified so that they can be used for public water supplies.
Record #:
34175
Author(s):
Abstract:
A conference committee of the North Carolina General Assembly convened on May 21 to consider a bill that would allow the Environmental Management Commission additional time to adopt water supply classifications and management requirements and classify all existing watersheds. The legislature also considered bills that would allow the collection of fees to help support state and local environmental services.
Record #:
34189
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Division of Environmental Management’s Water Quality Section is preparing to implement a river-basin wide strategy for protecting surface water quality. The strategy will integrate information from water quality and biological monitoring, wastewater discharge permitting, and nonpoint source pollution control efforts to give regulators a complete picture of water quality conditions in each of the state’s river basins.