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7 results for Water quality management--Coastal
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Record #:
15971
Author(s):
Abstract:
Much of the aesthetic, economic, and biological significance of the coastal zone is dependent on the maintenance of high water quality. However, many of the ways in which people enjoy and exploit coastal resources create disruptions in the natural system, jeopardizing the health of the coastal environment. Although storm water plays an important and indisputable role in declining water quality, it is an ambiguous culprit. Programs undertaken by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have implemented storm water regulations to manage coastal water quality.
Source:
Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 25 Issue 2, Summer 2000, p36-40
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Record #:
33355
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Soil and Water Conservation Commission has unanimously approved a resolution calling for expansion of the North Carolina Agriculture Cost Share Program addressing water management, soil resource protection, and waste management. The resolution is based on a study which indicated that water quality in the coastal counties represented one of the most critical needs.
Record #:
33352
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Department of Natural Resources and Community Development has proposed new rules for storm water control. Storm water runoff from coastal development is a major problem because it contaminates fragile shellfish waters in North Carolina. This article discusses the issue and reviews the proposed rules.
Record #:
33584
Author(s):
Abstract:
Governor Jim Martin has established a special Coastal Initiative Commission to gather information from citizens about ways to balance environmental protection with coastal development and economic opportunities. The initiative focuses on protection of water quality and fisheries habitats, preserving natural coastal features, and encouraging waterfront development.
Record #:
34267
Author(s):
Abstract:
The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) have concluded their assessment of North Carolina’s Coastal Nonpoint Pollution Control Program and how well it conforms to regulatory requirements. The state’s program was given “conditional approval” and will have five years to meet their conditions.
Record #:
34334
Author(s):
Abstract:
Following a three-year effort to improve coastal land-use planning, the North Carolina Coastal Resources Commission adopted changes to Coastal Area Management Act (CAMA) land-use planning guidelines in October. CAMA requires the twenty coastal counties to prepare land-use plans, but planning is optional for municipalities in those counties. The new guidelines offer three levels of plans that give local governments flexibility to meet local needs, while seeking to improve protection of coastal water quality.
Record #:
40009
Author(s):
Abstract:
Organizations interested in becoming better caretakers to North Carolina’s 1700 watersheds created the North Carolina Watershed Stewardship Network. In addition to workshops, the Network has engaged in initiatives such as obtaining feedback from communities about research, education, and training support needed to resolve water-resource issues. Also affirming the Network’s necessity was water-related stories shared by the North Carolina Sea Grant staff and friends, told in words and photos.
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