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8 results for Water conservation--North Carolina, Eastern
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Record #:
4904
Author(s):
Abstract:
With underground water storage capacity dropping in the fifteen county Central Coastal Plain Capacity Use Area, regulations governing water usage there could be implemented as early as 2002. Some users of over 100,000 gallons of water a day, like towns and factories, would need a special permit and be required to report water use rates to the state.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 20 Issue 1, Winter 2001, p4
Record #:
5483
Author(s):
Abstract:
Groundwater is North Carolina is becoming polluted and over consumed. Most of the counties east of I-95 are almost totally dependent on groundwater as a water source. Two sections, a fifteen-county area surrounding and including Greenville, and parts of Robeson, Bladen, and Columbus Counties, are pumping water faster than it can be replenished. The 2002 North Carolina General Assembly will consider regulations to deal with these problem areas.
Record #:
25281
Author(s):
Abstract:
As there is only a finite amount of water on the planet, drastic measures must be taken to ensure that we do not run through that amount too quickly.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 23 Issue 3, Summer 2004, p6
Record #:
25319
Author(s):
Abstract:
With drought still hanging heavily over communities along the Tar River, it is imperative that the people there employ water conservation methods such as rain harvesting.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 27 Issue 2, Summer 2008, p1, 5
Record #:
25314
Author(s):
Abstract:
Grady McCallie goes over possible solutions to North Carolina’s drought and explains how those solutions need to be taken a step further.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 27 Issue 1, Spring 2008, p1
Record #:
25316
Author(s):
Abstract:
While rains have decreased the drought alert for North Carolina there are still many ideas for water conservation. There are many ideas that have been proposed by the governor, but managing water resources wisely remains the best way to conserve water.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 27 Issue 1, Spring 2008, p6-7, il
Record #:
28236
Author(s):
Abstract:
Smithfield Packing is asking the Department of Environmental and Natural Resources to remove essential environmental protections from the Tar Heel plant’s wastewater discharge permit. Smithfield also wants limits lifted on groundwater withdrawal, to requirements rescinded for environmental management systems, and removal of a ban on buying hogs from farms that use waste lagoons. The company is being regulated for many environmental violations and for their excessive use of groundwater, both of which harm local residents and the environment.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 14, April 2007, p23-24 Periodical Website
Record #:
40009
Author(s):
Abstract:
Organizations interested in becoming better caretakers to North Carolina’s 1700 watersheds created the North Carolina Watershed Stewardship Network. In addition to workshops, the Network has engaged in initiatives such as obtaining feedback from communities about research, education, and training support needed to resolve water-resource issues. Also affirming the Network’s necessity was water-related stories shared by the North Carolina Sea Grant staff and friends, told in words and photos.
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