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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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11 results for Grizzard, Kim
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Record #:
23110
Author(s):
Abstract:
Elm Street Park in Greenville is among the best Little League fields in the Carolinas. At 65 years old, the field has hosted a number of championship games and Little Leaguers throughout the South look forward to playing on the renowned field.
Source:
Greenville: Life in the East (NoCar F264 G8 G743), Vol. Issue , Summer 2015, p34-38, il, por
Record #:
23113
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hall of Fame water skier, Kristi Overton Johnson, discusses her career, life, and Christian faith in this biographical sketch.
Source:
Greenville: Life in the East (NoCar F264 G8 G743), Vol. Issue , Spring 2015, p8-11, il, por
Record #:
24759
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 2014, Greenville was considered one of the top five places to retire in the United States. A number of factors attract retirees, including longer summers, shorter lines, aesthetics, and tax rates.
Source:
Greenville: Life in the East (NoCar F264 G8 G743), Vol. Issue , Winter 2015, p12-13, il, por
Record #:
28764
Author(s):
Abstract:
Christ Covenant School is graduating their first class of high school seniors since the school’s opening in 2000. Several of the graduating class of 16 students entered the school together in kindergarten and they discuss their experiences. The history of the school, the experiences of the students, and the community the school has fostered are all explored.
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Record #:
29627
Author(s):
Abstract:
The recent trend of tiny house living has spread to Greenville, North Carolina. These tiny houses, which are as small as three-hundred square feet, promote a more affordable and simple lifestyle. Pitt County officials are now considering building and zoning requirements for tiny house development.
Source:
Greenville: Life in the East (NoCar F264 G8 G743), Vol. Issue , Fall 2017, p28-32, por
Record #:
34409
Author(s):
Abstract:
Dr. Donna Lake is a clinical associate professor in the East Carolina University College of Nursing and Brody School of Medicine, and a retired Colonel in the United States Air Force Nurse Corps. After twenty-five years serving in the military, Lake works in the front lines of nursing to change the way health care providers are trained so that they work as a team. Currently, she is working on ways to help military nurses transition to academic faculty positions and to prepare nurses for hospital leadership.
Source:
Greenville: Life in the East (NoCar F264 G8 G743), Vol. Issue , Summer 2018, p28-34, por
Record #:
36186
Author(s):
Abstract:
Before the establishment of the Human Library was the Lector Book Club, with member just as willing to open up the chapters of their lives. In fact, for some, discussions about books had become superseded by conversations about real life events, whether national or personal.
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Record #:
39920
Author(s):
Abstract:
The setting in Shelia Turnage’s novels proves that facts from a writer’s life always find their way into his or her fiction. Tupelo’s Landing resembles the town where Turnage lives and any small town in the South. Evidence includes a list of lines quoted from her Dale and Mo mystery series.
Source:
Greenville: Life in the East (NoCar F264 G8 G743), Vol. Issue , Fall 2015 , p50-52, 54
Record #:
39935
Author(s):
Abstract:
Successor of the first black female ordained rabbi, Karz-Wagman became the first male rabbi in a decade for Bayt Shalom. His passion for social justice, coupled with legal experience, can be filtered seamlessly into his faith tradition’s call for social justice and adherence to Jewish law.
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Record #:
40789
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Neuse and Tar-Pamlico River Basins are kept sound places to work and play because of organizations like Rivers Sound. This nonprofit helps to enhance this water’s quality by initiatives such as onsite testing, legislative level advocacy, and community-wide education.
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Record #:
40904
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Lost Colony Center for Science and Research’s director supports a less popular theory for the Roanoke Colony’s fate. Fred Willard doesn't support the conventional theories: they succumbed to starvation or became massacre victims. His quest for truth has also led to this possibility: the presence of colonists’ surnames in Eastern North Carolina families claiming a Native American heritage suggests they moved inland and integrated.
Source:
Greenville: Life in the East (NoCar F264 G8 G743), Vol. Issue , Summer 2016, p12-14, 46