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11 results for Hope Plantation (Windsor)
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Record #:
2801
Author(s):
Abstract:
Visitors to Hope Plantation and the King-Basemore House in Bertie County experience rural life in the northeastern part of the state as it was lived in the late 18th- and early 19th-centuries.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 56 Issue 1, June 1988, p12-14, il
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Record #:
5056
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hope Plantation, in Windsor in Bertie County, was built in the early 1800s by David Stone, who was governor of North Carolina, 1808-1810. It is the state's finest example of Palladian-style architecture. Lea describes the building's history and how it was rescued and restored. Restoration on Hope began in 1965.
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Record #:
5216
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hope Plantation was built in 1803 by David Stone, who was governor from 1808 to 1810. Visitors to the stately Bertie County plantation can experience rural life in the northeastern part of the state as it was lived in the late 18th- and early 19th-centuries.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Spring 2002, p21-22, il Periodical Website
Record #:
6557
Abstract:
In 1965, a group called the Historic Hope Foundation set out to save an abandoned house in Bertie County called Hope. The house had been built by David Stone, who was very active in state politics. He had been a member of the General Assembly, superior court judge, a member of the U.S. House of Representatives, a U.S. Senator, and in 1808, governor of North Carolina. Within a year enough money had been raised to buy the house and eighteen acres of land. Restoration of the property began immediately. By 1972, Hope Plantation had been entered on the Register of Historic Places and opened to the public.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 4, May 1980, p36-38, il
Record #:
8251
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hope Plantation, Bertie County's finest historic home, was built in 1803 by David Stone, who was governor from 1808 to 1810. In 1965, a group called the Historic Hope Foundation set out to save the abandoned house. By 1972, Hope Plantation had been restored, entered on the Register of Historic Places, and opened to the public. Visitors to the stately plantation can experience rural life in the northeastern part of the state as it was lived in the late 18- and early 19th-centuries.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 6, Nov 2006, p188-190, 192, 194, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
31151
Author(s):
Abstract:
Located in Bertie County, four miles west of Windsor, Hope Plantation offers glimpses of late 18th- and 19th-century in eastern North Carolina as well as the life of its original owner, former North Carolina governor David Stone. The plantation’s centerpiece is the 1803 mansion, an architectural combination of Federal and Georgian architecture. June 14 is Hope Plantation’s 200th birthday and a special event will feature stories from descendants and former plantation residents.
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Record #:
35579
Author(s):
Abstract:
The historic trail of Eastern NC, covering towns such as Fayetteville and Windsor, was a road with plenty of landmarks. Contained for the tourists’ consideration were many of the state’s acre bound treasures—over two thirds, according to the author. Examples of these historic properties were Charles B. Aycock’s birthplace and the James Iredell House.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 4, Aug/Sept 1973, p30-31
Record #:
37358
Abstract:
Historic Hope Foundation’s open house opens a door into the past of this house in Windsor. Also opening the door to Bertie’s County Colonial past is King-Bazemore House, moved on site from a few miles away. Described by the author as self-contained, Hope Plantation functioned through its own water powered grist mill, saw mill, blacksmith shop, blacksmith’s and cooper’s shops, and buildings for weaving and spinning. King-Bazemore’s “hall and parlor” design was common in dwellings from this era and its furnishings design is based on William King’s 1778 inventory.
Record #:
38122
Author(s):
Abstract:
The 250th anniversary of Windsor’s founding yielded a three days’ celebration. Food and fun were offered by food trucks and carriage rides. Entertainment and enlightenment were provided in music by the Pocosin Band, historic homes tours, and visits to the “Back in the Day” museum.
Record #:
38369
Author(s):
Abstract:
A general history of the Hope Plantation & King-Bazemore House.
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Record #:
39424
Author(s):
Abstract:
The article is about the old ways to make butter. Pat Sawyer of Hope Plantation demonstrates how to do it.