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4 results for Architecture, Georgian style
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Record #:
18846
Author(s):
Abstract:
Based on the stylistic tradition of Wren's English Palladianism popularized in the 17th century, Georgian style architecture became popular in the 18th century in America. In North Carolina, many elements of the Georgian style are combine din imaginative and unconventional ways, producing unique visual effects.
Source:
North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. Issue 52, Aug/Sept 1984, p14, f
Record #:
37382
Abstract:
An exploration revealed its many purposes since 1784. Home for John Stanly Wright's family until the Civil War, it was General Burnside’s New Bern headquarters and a convent for the Sisters of Mercy through 1884. Heirs of James Bryan owned the house until 1932, when it was sold to the New Bern Library Association. The house was the town’s library for three decades before Tryon Palace Commission purchased the building, restored its Georgian style, and moved it to its current location, George Street.
Source:
The Palace (NoCar F 264 N5 P3), Vol. 13 Issue 2, Winter 2015/2016, p6-8
Record #:
37358
Abstract:
Historic Hope Foundation’s open house opens a door into the past of this house in Windsor. Also opening the door to Bertie’s County Colonial past is King-Bazemore House, moved on site from a few miles away. Described by the author as self-contained, Hope Plantation functioned through its own water powered grist mill, saw mill, blacksmith shop, blacksmith’s and cooper’s shops, and buildings for weaving and spinning. King-Bazemore’s “hall and parlor” design was common in dwellings from this era and its furnishings design is based on William King’s 1778 inventory.
Record #:
38303
Author(s):
Abstract:
Originally known as the Governor’s Palace, Tryon Palace’s restoration in the late 1950s also entailed rebuilding its grounds. In this part of the project, preservationists had to employ educated guesswork and imagination more than archaeo-historical evidence.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 79 Issue 5, Oct 2011, p196-198, 200, 202, 204, 206, 208 Periodical Website