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4 results for Plantations--Pitt County
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Record #:
23464
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1853, Spencer Harris, one of Pitt County's most affluent planters, built a new plantation house near Falkland Township off modern Highway 121. The house was built in the Greek revival style of the day. When Spencer Harris died in 1872, he left the house to his widow, Margaret, and their youngest son, William. William Harris, a prosperous cattle dealer in Pitt County, lived in the house until his death in 1905. The house then passed to William's brother, John Spencer Harris, who lived in it until 1908. In 1911, William Howard Harris acquired the house from his late father. The Lewis family became the property owners in 1923 and rented it out to the Garris family. In 2000, Judge J.B. Lewis sold the house to Tom and Jeanette Painter, who have restored the structure to its original appearance and grandeur.
Record #:
26732
Abstract:
The Grimes Plantation is one of the oldest properties in Pitt County and it was named for Confederate general Bryan Grimes who became a prominent farmer in Pitt County after the Civil War. Eddie Smith, a native of Lexington, has restored Grimesland Plantation to its original painting and details.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 84 Issue 3, August 2016, p82-101, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
22901
Author(s):
Abstract:
Located near Belvoir along the Tar River, Bensboro was once the ancestral home of the Atkinson family of Pitt County. In the late 1700s and early 1800s, Benjamin Atkinson made it a thriving commercial center with his store and consistent transporting business. When he died on February 2, 1816 at 63 years of age, his businesses were divided and sold. However, the 1,500 acres of plantation were not sold. Ben Ashley Atkinson inherited the land and tried to use the plantation as the cocoonery for a Greenville Silk Company. Peyton Ashley Atkinson took over Bensboro on October 1, 1839 after his father Ben Ashley died. Peyton married the very prominent Susan Virginia Streeter of Greene County on July 27, 1843. This marriage caused Peyton Atkinson to run two plantations in two different counties: Bensboro in Pitt County and Streeter in Greene County. By this time, Bensboro was apparently a beautiful place with its lush trees and rich furnishings. After Peyton died on February 2, 1863, Benjamin Streeter Atkinson took over the plantations. He was elected to serve in the state legislature. However, debts and economic recessions caused Bensboro to become disarrayed. Bensboro burned in 1895 and Susan Streeter Atkinson died on December 4, 1895. Thus, Bensboro finally was lost forever.
Source:
Record #:
40833
Author(s):
Abstract:
What made the daunting task of restoring this former plantation house worthwhile: restoring also the only example in the county of transitional architecture between the Georgian and Federalist styles. What also made the task worthwhile was unexpected fruit of their labor: helping a local add a branch to her family tree, by the discovery of an ancestor born there.
Source:
Greenville: Life in the East (NoCar F264 G8 G743), Vol. Issue , Winter 2019, p20, 22-24