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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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5 results for Architecture, Federal style
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Record #:
18849
Author(s):
Abstract:
Federal, or Adamesque, architecture from the late 18th to the early 19th centuries, ushered in a new period of refinement and attention to detail lacking in the Georgian style. In North Carolina, artisans recreated some elements of the Federal style with the addition of their own interpretations.
Source:
North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. Issue 53, Oct/Nov 1984, p8, f
Record #:
37320
Abstract:
In the area of Washington formerly known as “Pungo Town,” the Federal Style residence built by two brothers has changed little since its construction in 1795. Passed down to members of the Marsh family until 1942, a relative of former owners restored the house to National Trust preservation guidelines as part of her master’s thesis. The Congletons continue the architectural integrity tradition for the residence whose housing history includes Union officers during the Civil War.
Record #:
37358
Abstract:
Historic Hope Foundation’s open house opens a door into the past of this house in Windsor. Also opening the door to Bertie’s County Colonial past is King-Bazemore House, moved on site from a few miles away. Described by the author as self-contained, Hope Plantation functioned through its own water powered grist mill, saw mill, blacksmith shop, blacksmith’s and cooper’s shops, and buildings for weaving and spinning. King-Bazemore’s “hall and parlor” design was common in dwellings from this era and its furnishings design is based on William King’s 1778 inventory.
Record #:
37417
Author(s):
Abstract:
George Dixon’s loss of dwelling and dream was the Palace’s gain, as one of the three historical homes for tour at the Palace. How Dixon lost this home, through a series of financial misfortunes, is described in detail. Described nearly as well are the owners, occupiers, and renters who resided in the Federal style dwelling before it became part of Tryon Palace’s architectural showpieces in 1957.
Source:
The Palace (NoCar F 264 N5 P3), Vol. 12 Issue 1, Winter 2013/2014, p26-29
Record #:
36142
Author(s):
Abstract:
Historic homes such as the Isaac Taylor House and John Wright Stanly House had another value to the community: tales of their reputed hauntings. Other house related horror stories noted were a ghost encountered at the Cherry Point Marine Corp Air Station and vigil involving a parrot.