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252 results for North Carolina Preservation
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Record #:
17
Abstract:
Researchers are using the method of dendrochronology to determine the construction date of the historic Cupola House in Edenton.
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North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. Issue 83, Fall 1991, p1, il
Record #:
4248
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Abstract:
The Stedman Incentive Grant, worth $5,000, assists non-profit organizations in efforts to save endangered architecturally and historically significant property. Asheville's historic Hopkins Chapel A.M.E. Zion Church, designed in 1910, received the 1996 Stedman award. The congregation, which once considered demolishing the building because of its structural problems, is now developing fundraising and preservation strategies. The church will use the Stedman Grant to stabilize the roof and the internal framing of the sanctuary floor.
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North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. Issue 102, Winter 1997, p3-4, il
Record #:
4245
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Abstract:
Dr. Benjamin F. Speller, Jr., Dean of the School of Library and Information Sciences at North Carolina Central University in Durham, received the 1998 Ruth Coltrane Cannon Award, the state's most prestigious preservation award. Speller's contributions to historic preservation are many, including the renovation of Durham's Historic St. Joseph's AME Church and establishing the African-American Resources Collection at North Carolina Central University, which includes over half a million manuscripts, oral histories, and videos.
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North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. Issue 112, Summer 1999, p16, por
Record #:
4246
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The Robert E. Stipe Award is the state's highest award given to working professionals demonstrating outstanding commitment to historic preservation as part of their job. Rodney L. Swink, director of the North Carolina Main Street Center, received the 1998 award. The center, a nationally recognized program, seeks to revitalize downtowns around the state, developing them economically, while preserving historically at the same time.
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North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. Issue 112, Summer 1999, p17, por
Record #:
4247
Author(s):
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The L. Vincent Lowe, Jr., Business Award is the highest preservation award given to a state business for promoting protection of architectural resources in the state. The Mast General Store received the 1998 award. The store, located in Watauga County between Vilas and Banner Elk, was built in the 1880s and is one of the last of its kind. In 1973, it was included on the National Register of Historic Places.
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North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. Issue 112, Summer 1999, p18, il
Record #:
4252
Author(s):
Abstract:
Although architect James F. Post did most of the planning, family sources indicate inspiration for the design of the Bellamy Mansion came from Dr. John D. Bellamy's eldest daughter, Mary Elizabeth. The home was built in 1859-61. Mary also had input in furniture and fabric selections and created a number of oil paintings for the walls. Forced to flee Wilmington during the Civil War and the Union occupation, the family was able to enjoy their home only after the Yankees went home.
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North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. Issue 101, Summer/Fall 1996, p10-11, il, por
Record #:
4255
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Robert E. Stipe Professional Award is the state's highest award given to working professionals demonstrating outstanding commitment to historic preservation as part of their job. Jo Ramsey Leimenstoll, architect and associate professor at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, received the award in 1996. Leimenstoll has worked with the North Carolina Main Street Program, was project architect on the Thomas Day/Union Tavern restoration in Milton, and is one of the country's foremost authorities on designing sympathetic additions to historic buildings.
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North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. Issue 102, Winter 1997, p2-3, por
Record #:
4249
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Minnette C. Duffy Award is the state's highest award for the preservation, restoration, or maintenance of grounds related to historic structures. The Chinqua-Penn Plantation gardens in Reidsville were developed in the 1920s. However, subsequent owners did not keep them up, and by the 1980s, the gardens had fallen into ruin. The Chinqua-Penn Foundation, Inc., formed in 1992, restored the gardens according to their 1920s layout. The Foundation received the award in 1996.
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North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. Issue 102, Winter 1997, p4-5, il
Record #:
4250
Author(s):
Abstract:
The L. Vincent Lowe, Jr. Award is the highest preservation award given to a state business for promoting protection of architectural resources in the state. William A. V. Cecil received the 1996 award for turning neglected Biltmore Estate in Asheville into a major tourist attraction, while at the same time stimulating economic growth in the region.
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North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. Issue 102, Winter 1997, p5, por
Record #:
4253
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Raleigh native Richard H. Jenrette received the nation's highest preservation honor in October 1996, when he was presented the Louise duPont Crowninshield Award. The award is given by the National Trust for Historic Preservation. Jenrette has given his expertise, time, and resources to many preservation projects, including restoration of Ayr Mount in Hillsborough, one of the state's finest Federal-style houses.
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North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. Issue 102, Winter 1997, p1, por
Record #:
4257
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Stedman Incentive Grant, which is worth $5,000, assists non-profit organizations in their efforts to save endangered architecturally and historically significant property. The Caswell County Historical Association received the grant in 1998 for their work in ensuring proper restoration of the Caswell County Courthouse. The building is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
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North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. Issue 112, Summer 1999, p19, il
Record #:
4256
Author(s):
Abstract:
Gertrude S. Carraway was a leader in the work to restore Tryon Palace. The Awards of Merit, named for her, recognize organizations and individuals demonstrating strong commitment to promotion of historic preservation. The 1998 Award of Merit winners include Arlene and Daniel Stowe, Lynne Galvin, Jerry Nix, Rex Todd, and Mildred and Ed Page.
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North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. Issue 112, Summer 1999, p21-27, il
Record #:
4251
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Gertrude S. Carraway Award of Merit recognizes organizations and individuals demonstrating strong commitment to promotion of historical preservation. The 1996 winners of Awards of Merit include Mark Wilde-Ramsing of Wilmington, Pam Turner of Asheville, St. Philip's Episcopal Church in Brevard, and the Catawba County Historical Association.
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North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. Issue 102, Winter 1997, p6-11, il
Record #:
4254
Author(s):
Abstract:
Virginia A. Stevens, president of Preservation North Carolina from 1992 to 1994, received the 1996 Ruth Coltrane Cannon Award for statewide and local leadership in historic preservation over the past two decades. Stevens has been active in preservation efforts in Raleigh and Blowing Rock. The award is the state's most prestigious preservation one.
Source:
North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. Issue 102, Winter 1997, p2, por
Record #:
4258
Author(s):
Abstract:
Built in 1902, with later expansion in 1921, the Loray Mill in Gaston County was known as the world's largest textile mill under one roof. The mill was saved from demolition when the owner, Bridgestone/Firestone, donated it to Preservation North Carolina in December 1998. Rehabilitation plans include using it for a civic center, office-retail complex, and condominiums. Plans are also underway to nominate the 600,000 square-foot mill as a National Historic Landmark.
Source:
North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. Issue 111, Spring 1999, p1, il