NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


8 results for Buck, Tara
Currently viewing results 1 - 8
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
18846
Author(s):
Abstract:
Based on the stylistic tradition of Wren's English Palladianism popularized in the 17th century, Georgian style architecture became popular in the 18th century in America. In North Carolina, many elements of the Georgian style are combine din imaginative and unconventional ways, producing unique visual effects.
Source:
North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. Issue 52, Aug/Sept 1984, p14, f
Record #:
18852
Author(s):
Abstract:
Early Victorian architecture is characterized by Gothic Revival and Italianate styles. North Carolina does not have many examples of Gothic Revival residences due to the lasting popularity of the Greek Revival until the Civil War; however, the Italianate style did gain popularity due to its complement to the Greek Revival style.
Source:
North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. Issue 56, Apr/May 1985, p8-9, f
Record #:
18853
Author(s):
Abstract:
One of the most popular domestic Victorian architectural styles in American was Second Empire Style. Although abundant throughout America, there are few examples in North Carolina. Many of Second Empire examples in North Carolina were built by northerners who immigrated south after the Civil War.
Source:
North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. Issue 57, June/July 1985, p11, f
Record #:
18849
Author(s):
Abstract:
Federal, or Adamesque, architecture from the late 18th to the early 19th centuries, ushered in a new period of refinement and attention to detail lacking in the Georgian style. In North Carolina, artisans recreated some elements of the Federal style with the addition of their own interpretations.
Source:
North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. Issue 53, Oct/Nov 1984, p8, f
Record #:
18850
Author(s):
Abstract:
Tied to cultural and political change in the early 19th century, Greek Revival Style architecture promoted the paragon of democracy, using columns and in both rural and urban buildings throughout North Carolina.
Source:
North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. Issue 54, Dec 1984, p8-9, f
Record #:
18856
Author(s):
Abstract:
Dissimilar shapes, sizes, textures, and bold colors describe Victorian architecture styles of Queen Anne and Eastlake, both prominent in North Carolina.
Source:
North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. Issue 58, Aug/Sept 1985, p10, f
Record #:
18859
Author(s):
Abstract:
During the late 19th- to the mid 20th-centuries, Americans had collectively achieved the highest standard of living to date. Drawing on this and the new suburban lifestyle, the Bungalow style of architecture in North Carolina is found in numerous examples.
Source:
North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. Issue 60, Dec 1985, p4, f
Record #:
18858
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Classical Revival, or Neoclassicism, a reaction against Victorian styles of the 19th-century, closely resemble those of the Greek Revival for homes built in North Carolina.
Source:
North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. Issue 59, Oct/Nov 1985, p11, f