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9 results for New Bern, Battle of, N.C., 1862
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Record #:
27899
Author(s):
Abstract:
Major General Lawrence O’Bryan Branch, was one of the South’s most promising military and potential political leaders. As the Civil War progressed, Confederate forces suffered a shortage of officers and Branch was given command of a North Carolina brigade comprising five regiments. After the Battle of New Bern and numerous skirmishes, Branch was killed on the battlefield of Sharpsburg.
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Record #:
36145
Author(s):
Abstract:
His memories lasted for the war’s duration, from his enlistment at 17 to release from service in July 1865. His military service included the Battle of New Bern (1862); encampment at Goldsboro; imprisonments at Fort Delaware and Point Lookout. Alluded was how religion and humor helped to soften the otherwise hard experience of combat. Harshness not hinted were the economic fallout of Reconstruction for the South and life on his family’s plantation.
Record #:
37417
Author(s):
Abstract:
George Dixon’s loss of dwelling and dream was the Palace’s gain, as one of the three historical homes for tour at the Palace. How Dixon lost this home, through a series of financial misfortunes, is described in detail. Described nearly as well are the owners, occupiers, and renters who resided in the Federal style dwelling before it became part of Tryon Palace’s architectural showpieces in 1957.
Source:
The Palace (NoCar F 264 N5 P3), Vol. 12 Issue 1, Winter 2013/2014, p26-29
Record #:
37413
Author(s):
Abstract:
A close examination was offered to three of the Palace's recent acquisitions. These were Eastern Piedmont pottery from the 19th and 20th centuries; manuscript collections from Judge William J. Gaston, whose accomplishments include penning “The Old North State”; a map of the Battle of New Bern, a 1900 blueprint copy of a map drawn by an unidentified Union soldier.
Source:
The Palace (NoCar F 264 N5 P3), Vol. 12 Issue 1, Winter 2013/2014, p6-7
Record #:
36135
Author(s):
Abstract:
This former soldier’s letters bear a close resemblance of the truth about life in combat. Expected details included troop movements and the Union army’s advantages. The unexpected was his surprise that the war continued, given the rules implemented by the times: short term enlistments, officers’ elections by their troops, and recruitment provisions such as apples and cigars.
Record #:
36136
Abstract:
The Union Army’s success in capturing New Bern in 1862 involved famous military men such as General Ambrose Burnside. The Confederate general presiding over the troop for this famous battle was Lawrence Branch. The latter, though perhaps lesser known in history books, was celebrated as equally important through the CSA monument in Cedar Grove Cemetery.
Record #:
36137
Author(s):
Abstract:
This Civil War general may be better known for his popularization of this aspect of male hairstyle. The profile, however, focused more on his military career. Among the highlights were his role in the capturing of New Bern, known familiarly as the Battle of 1862.
Record #:
37944
Author(s):
Abstract:
By 1862, North Carolina was divided by more than region. In the Piedmont and mountains, secessionists had control of the government. In the Coastal Plain, there was vast Union troop occupation, from major battle losses in Washington, New Bern, Morehead City, Wilmington, Beaufort. All over the state, chaos was also the victor because of conditions such as diphtheria outbreaks; guerrilla forces called “buffaloes”; Confederate forces that were intermittently organized; military generals seizing governmental control in the void of political leadership.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 12, May 2014, p214-216, 218-222, 224 Periodical Website
Record #:
39448
Author(s):
Abstract:
Discussed in this article is two encounters between David Dunn’s servant, Nat, and Union soldiers; the sale of David Dunn’s plantation to Mrs. Lewis Whitford; and a barbecue recipe that includes an update from the sauce’s original ingredients.