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5 results for Hoke, Robert Frederick, 1837-1912
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Record #:
3319
Abstract:
Born in Lincoln County in 1837, Robert Johnston, Robert Hoke, and Stephen Ramseur little knew their boyhood war games would become reality when they saw service as Confederate army generals in the Civil War.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 56 Issue 9, Feb 1989, p6-9, por
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Record #:
14501
Author(s):
Abstract:
Robert F. Hoke has been classified as the greatest solider North Carolina ever produced. Entering the Civil War as a second lieutenant, he came out as a Major General.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 13 Issue 5, June 1945, p6, 17
Full Text:
Record #:
18178
Author(s):
Abstract:
Beam recounts how General Robert Hoke's old home in Lincolnton was restored.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 8 Issue 38, Feb 1941, p4, 18, il
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Record #:
14383
Abstract:
Providing military leaders was one of the many contributions North Carolina made to the Confederate cause. Almost three dozen men served as generals of various ranks. Barefoot focuses on two of them - Robert F. Hoke and Stephen Dodson Ramseur. Born four days and thirty miles apart in 1837, they were friends for life, but each met different fates. Hoke survived the war as the state's top general, but Ramseur was killed in the fighting in the Shenandoah Valley.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 50 Issue 2, Spring 2011, p30-33, il, por
Record #:
37944
Author(s):
Abstract:
By 1862, North Carolina was divided by more than region. In the Piedmont and mountains, secessionists had control of the government. In the Coastal Plain, there was vast Union troop occupation, from major battle losses in Washington, New Bern, Morehead City, Wilmington, Beaufort. All over the state, chaos was also the victor because of conditions such as diphtheria outbreaks; guerrilla forces called “buffaloes”; Confederate forces that were intermittently organized; military generals seizing governmental control in the void of political leadership.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 12, May 2014, p214-216, 218-222, 224 Periodical Website