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25 results for Craven County--History
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Record #:
2818
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Abstract:
A political campaign dispute between Richard Dobbs Spaight, Sr., and John Stanly culminated in the summer of 1802, when the men fought the state's most famous duel in New Bern. Spaight was mortally wounded.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 56 Issue 6, Nov 1988, p16-17, por
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Record #:
18452
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Abstract:
Continuing his travels around the state, Goerch describes the things of interest he found in Craven County. He says \"from an historical standpoint, the county probably has more firsts, to its credit than any other county in the state,\" and he includes a list of them at the end of the article. The article includes small descriptions of a number of historic homes in the town of New Bern.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 9 Issue 29, Dec 1941, p1-420-23, il
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Record #:
20099
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This article looks at the history of New Bern and Craven County between 1700 and 1800, focusing on Cary's Rebellion and the Tuscarora War.
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Record #:
22339
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Abstract:
This survey of colonial history traces Craven County from its initial settlement in 1709 through to establishment of the first printer in New Bern in 1749.
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Record #:
24646
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Tryon Palace in New Bern opens to the public April 2, 1959. The original building was commissioned in 1767 by Royal Governor William Tryon (1729-1788); John Hawks (ca. 1734-1790) served as the architect. This article discusses the building’s history and the restorations leading up to its grand opening.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 22, April 1959, p8-9, il
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Record #:
32370
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This is an undated petition for resurvey sent to the NC Secretary of State Court of Claims that tells of the 1714 Indian Massacre of Furnifold Green’s son, a white servant and two negro slaves.
Record #:
36989
Abstract:
A pioneering female photographer, with a body of work including 600,000 photographs, also left behind the clapboard house where her career began. Among the accomplishments her historic house became the site of was designing the first Pepsi-Cola logo for the pharmacist who invented the beverage.
Record #:
36523
Abstract:
The author talks about President George Washington in 1791 on his Southern Tour stopping at Col. John Allen’s plantation in Craven County, NC and having breakfast and being at a public dinner in New Bern, NC.
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Record #:
36124
Abstract:
Expected was the 1910 celebration: it was the bicentennial of New Bern’s founding. As for one not expected, the author explained its coming from the “tenor of the times.” It, hosted by the newly created historical society, had a guest list including descendants of Baron Christopher de Graffenried and Colonial homes open to visitors. Another aspect remembrance worthy was the first contribution to Tryon Palace’s 1950s restoration, a surplus from funds for the 1929 event.
Record #:
36127
Author(s):
Abstract:
Among New Bern’s founding fathers were Baron Christopher deGraffenried, also known as Baron Christopher von Graffenried. His prominent place in the town’s history could be justified by founding the regarded center of the town and its Colonial life: a church. Though not be regarded the center any longer, the church still held an important place. That may be defined by its tombstones’ names, reflected in contemporary families, and mirrored in its architecture, a timely reflection.
Record #:
36123
Author(s):
Abstract:
New Bern’s denizens have an equivalent of Tara on Washington Post Road. The dwelling built in 1760 translated the reel version of antebellum South to real life, as the Spaight family, the builders of Bellair, experienced it. Thompson’s article offers another connection with Bellair by a letter written in the house in 1776 by Mary Murphrey.
Record #:
36128
Abstract:
The historical reports and map representing Colonial New Bern were compiled by Baron Christoph deGraffenried, also known as Baron Christoph von Graffenried. An enduring connection was seen in the descendants of von Graffenried, some who attended the unveiling of the bust commemorating the town’s founder.
Record #:
36125
Author(s):
Abstract:
Craven County’s seat can count as part of its illustrious history: becoming the state capital in 1767 and site for the Governor’s new home that year. Even if it played such a role for only twenty-seven years, assured was its permanent place in New Bern’s history, as Tryon Palace.
Record #:
36133
Author(s):
Abstract:
New Bern, with maritime roots, became known as a major shipping port by the mid-eighteenth century. This helped to establish its place in the triangular trade and as the most populous town by the Revolution period. The War of 1812 and Civil War negatively impacted the trade-built economy. In fact, recovery by the 1870s occurred through growth in another industry: lumbering. Concerning its more current economy, industries contributing to its fiscal health since the nineteenth century were also transportation based: railroads and trucking.
Record #:
36135
Author(s):
Abstract:
This former soldier’s letters bear a close resemblance of the truth about life in combat. Expected details included troop movements and the Union army’s advantages. The unexpected was his surprise that the war continued, given the rules implemented by the times: short term enlistments, officers’ elections by their troops, and recruitment provisions such as apples and cigars.