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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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15 results for Baker, Mary
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Record #:
3243
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Plans for a permanent synagogue in New Bern began in the late 1800s. The structure was designed by Herbert W. Simpson and built in 1908 on Middle Street. Worshippers celebrated New Year's Day there on September 27, 1908.
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Record #:
3239
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The oldest church building in New Bern is First Presbyterian Church on New Street. The church was designed and built by Uriah Sandy. The cornerstone was laid on June 9, 1819.
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Record #:
3291
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Although Baptists were in New Bern in the 1730s, it was not until 1811 that a church was constructed. In 1848, a larger church was built on Middle Street. Renamed First Baptist Church in 1896, the church marked 150 years in 1988.
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Record #:
3780
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John Taylor was a self-made man. From humble beginnings and little formal education, he built an insurance agency and ran it 55 years. He was instrumental in reorganizing the New Bern Historical Society in 1952 and served as its president for ten years.
Record #:
27892
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After the Civil War, Reverend Edwin M. Forbes, a New Bern native, established an independent black congregation at St. Cyprian’s Church. In 1922, New Bern suffered a disastrous fire which burned mostly in black residential areas. The fire pointed out the need for a hospital for blacks, leading to the establishment of Good Shepherd Hospital.
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Record #:
27919
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In 1772, Anglican priest John Wesley sent Joseph Pilmore to New Bern, North Carolina to extend the work of the Methodists. The Methodists of New Bern became the most numerous denomination in the area. In 1843 the Centenary Methodist Church was built and named for the the fact that the religious reawakening of the church was about one-hundred years after the Aldersgate experience of John Wesley.
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Record #:
27923
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James City began as a community outside New Bern where slaves sought refuge and safekeeping. Reverend Horace James helped establish James City which eventually became a thriving small town. The social dynamics have changed over the years, and today a small group of its residents are working to preserve the history of this settlement.
Source:
Journal of the New Bern Historical Society (NoCar F 264 N5 J66), Vol. 6 Issue 1, May 1993, p17-24, map, bibl
Record #:
27938
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Following the Civil War, black missionaries from Baptist, A.M.E. Zion, and A.M.E. churches came south to work with the freed slaves and encourage independent black denominations. Jones Chapel A.M.E. Zion was the first of five churches established in James City, North Carolina in 1863.
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Record #:
27946
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Palatines, the first settlers in the New Bern area, created the first church in 1710. Shortly after their arrival, Christopher de Graffenried, founder of New Bern, established the Anglican Church which later reorganized into the Episcopal Church. Over the years, many churches of various denominations have been started in New Bern and Craven County.
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Record #:
27996
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Following the Tuscarora Indian War in 1711-1712, North Carolina realized the need for a money system. During the colonial period, hard currency continued to be scarce until recognition of the Reed Gold Mine in 1799. The state experienced a massive gold rush until the early 1800s, and since then, the exchange system has continued to evolve.
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Record #:
27992
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Taverns, which are also called inns or ordinaries, have historically been thought of as places where people met and drank. The role of taverns was much larger, actually, serving as places of refuge for travelers to New Bern. Taverns have also been centers for business, entertainment, and communication.
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Record #:
36127
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Among New Bern’s founding fathers were Baron Christopher deGraffenried, also known as Baron Christopher von Graffenried. His prominent place in the town’s history could be justified by founding the regarded center of the town and its Colonial life: a church. Though not be regarded the center any longer, the church still held an important place. That may be defined by its tombstones’ names, reflected in contemporary families, and mirrored in its architecture, a timely reflection.
Record #:
36134
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All Saints Chapel, built in the late 1890s and constructed in the Carpenter Gothic Style, was larger than its exterior suggested. As for other aspects of its appearance, longtime residents recall the exterior as painted white, but research by the author asserted otherwise. In fact, the recent repainting has returned the church to its original color, as well as the color scheme popular during the period in which the church was built.
Record #:
36131
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The church has had a broad appeal, in its denomination, the combined Christian Church and First Disciples of Christ, touted as the “largest denomination founded on American soil.” Its foundation was complete by the early nineteenth century, but it experienced a crumbling in terms of membership in the 1960s and early 1970s. By the new decade, though, it had rebuilt itself, congregation and worship space wise.
Record #:
4066
Abstract:
Taxation was a fact of life for the colonists as early as the 1600s. The main tax was the poll, or capitation, tax. However, as specific needs arose, taxes were levied for them. For example, in 1714-15, a tax paid for the Tuscarora War, and forts were built at Cape fear and Ocracoke with a eight-year tax levied in 1748.
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