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4 results for James City--History
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Record #:
8280
Author(s):
Abstract:
James City got its name from Captain Horace James, a former Yankee army chaplain, who established a camp across the river from New Bern, where many freed slaves settled. When asked to leave by the owner of the land, James A. Bryan, they refused, claiming the area was under martial law when they settled there. Bryan and his descendants battled in the courts for ownership of the land and finally won their case in 1893. By order of Governor Elias Carr, state troops moved into New Bern, prepared to evict the residents. The governor averted an outright war by offering the 557 families living in James City a chance to sign a lease, under which they would pay the Bryan family for the land. The only casualty of the “James City War” was Lt. Col. David Bogart, who was thrown from his horse and killed during a parade for the troops.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 7, Dec 1983, p17, 18, 30, por
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
27923
Author(s):
Abstract:
James City began as a community outside New Bern where slaves sought refuge and safekeeping. Reverend Horace James helped establish James City which eventually became a thriving small town. The social dynamics have changed over the years, and today a small group of its residents are working to preserve the history of this settlement.
Source:
Journal of the New Bern Historical Society (NoCar F 264 N5 J66), Vol. 6 Issue 1, May 1993, p17-24, map, bibl
Record #:
27938
Author(s):
Abstract:
Following the Civil War, black missionaries from Baptist, A.M.E. Zion, and A.M.E. churches came south to work with the freed slaves and encourage independent black denominations. Jones Chapel A.M.E. Zion was the first of five churches established in James City, North Carolina in 1863.
Source:
Record #:
22658
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina's coastal region is home to a rich African-American history with locations that reflect the highs and lows for this group during and after slavery. For example, the Great Dismal Swamp became a place of refuge for those seeking freedom before and during the American Civil War as part of the Maritime Underground Railroad. Other places on this route, such as Wilmington, are known for their role in slavery, while James City is known as a place populated by freed blacks.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 2, Spring 2015, p28-33, il, por Periodical Website