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9 results for African American communities
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Record #:
22534
Author(s):
Abstract:
The little community of Texana, a multi-ethnic community of whites, African Americans, and a few with Cherokee ancestry, was almost completely self-sufficient. Texana is located near the Cherokee town of Murphy, NC and is named for its founder, Texana McClelland, an African American woman who settled there in the 1850s.
Record #:
27270
Author(s):
Abstract:
Golden Belt is the last intact mill village in Durham. Its residents are lobbying the city to designate their neighborhood a local historic district, which would prevent unwanted new development or stabilize neighborhoods in transition. However, the Durham Rescue Mission is fighting against the designation because it would interfere with its plans to build a community center in the area.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 35, August 2016, p10-13, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
27923
Author(s):
Abstract:
James City began as a community outside New Bern where slaves sought refuge and safekeeping. Reverend Horace James helped establish James City which eventually became a thriving small town. The social dynamics have changed over the years, and today a small group of its residents are working to preserve the history of this settlement.
Source:
Journal of the New Bern Historical Society (NoCar F 264 N5 J66), Vol. 6 Issue 1, May 1993, p17-24, map, bibl
Record #:
27998
Author(s):
Abstract:
A new wastewater treatment plant that will serve Cary, Apex, Morrisville, and Holly Springs will be built in New Hill near the town’s historic district. Many of the residents of New Hill won’t be able to use the plant and will have to continue to run on septic systems. The town of New Hill is primarily African-American and the residents closest the plant are majority retirees and elderly. Residents of New Hill express their frustration and discuss their battle against the construction of the plant.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 32, July 2010, p14-19 Periodical Website
Record #:
22715
Author(s):
Abstract:
The East End/Valley Street neighborhood and the Nasty Branch Creek fostered a collective identity for the black public in Asheville, North Carolina in the 1950s-1970s. In the face of urban renewal, this neighborhood and surrounding environment provided economic opportunities and social networks.
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Record #:
28869
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1984, the Afro-American Cultural Center in Charlotte, and the Arts Center of Catawba Valley and Catawba County Council for the Arts in Hickory began their efforts to restore decaying community landmarks. Both places overcame economic challenges through community development and partnerships.
Source:
NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 2 Issue 4, July 1986, p3-5, il, por
Record #:
31450
Author(s):
Abstract:
The neighborhoods of Biddleville and Smallwood were once divided along racial lines. Now new and old residents are reinventing them together.
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Record #:
34440
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Moore’s Sanctuary is an African-American community in the west side of Charlotte, and its foundation has existed for 148 years. As the City of Charlotte faces a shortage in affordable and workforce housing, developers are looking to acquire property in the west side. Rickey Hall, founder of the West Side Community Land Trust, hopes to purchase land and ensure longtime west-side residents have a place to live as land values increase.
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Record #:
34442
Author(s):
Abstract:
McCrorey Heights is a neighborhood of about two-hundred ranch-style homes in northwest Charlotte where many of the major local civil rights accomplishments were born. Development and road construction threatens McCrorey Heights and the area’s history, while displacing many of the residents in the neighborhood.
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