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10 results for Civil rights movement--Activists
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Record #:
21563
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This article examines the trial of the \"Charlotte Three,\" African-American civil rights activists convicted of burning a Charlotte horse stable in 1969. The trial typified trials of activists around the South in the 1960s-70s. The strict sentences given to the defendants on the basis of dubious testimony and on prosecutors seeking convictions at all costs, contributed to the demise of civil rights activism.
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Record #:
21851
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This article looks at civil rights activist Floyd B. McKissick and his efforts to establish Soul City in rural Warren County, North Carolina in 1973. Soul City was an interracial community and the first new town planned by a minority developer. Soul City's remoteness made it difficult to attract residents, business, and industry though and the town was foreclosed by the Department of Housing and Urban Development in 1979.
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Record #:
27176
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Howard Clement III helped lead a boycott of white Durham merchants from 1968-1969, which began building his legacy as a local civil rights icon. Clement would go on to serve thirty years on the city council, longer than anyone else in Durham's history, before retiring two and a half years ago. He died last Wednesday of complications from Parkinson's disease at the age of eighty-two.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 22, June 2016, p10, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
27490
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On August 15-19, NC Central University hosted the first annual National Civil Rights Reunion and African-American Leadership Training Institute. The purpose was to reunite those who fought for civil rights during the 1960s and to educate and inspire the next generation of activists. Freedom Riders, members of the NAACP, the Congress of Racial Equality, and members of the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee, among others, were present and spoke at the conference.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 8 Issue 35, Aug. 29-Sept. 4 1990, p6-7 Periodical Website
Record #:
22701
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Greensboro, North Carolina became a central location for the civil rights movement in the 1960s starting with the North Carolina A&T sit-in. Within the Greensboro location, Elreta Alexander was a prominent African American attorney who advocated for civil rights through the judicial system.
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Record #:
28758
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Pauli Murray, a Durham activist and lawyer, spent her life facing discrimination and relentlessly pursuing justice. She understood the need to connect issues of race with gender, and was an influential leader in the civil rights movement. A mural painting and national historic landmark designation honor Murray’s legacy.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 2, Jan 2017, p29, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
30753
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In 1981, small business owner and civil rights activist Eddie McCoy began an African American oral history project in Granville Co, NC. While not a trained historian, McCoy’s interviews stand apart from other oral history projects with respect to the insight and perspective he could elicit from his subjects, which possible reflects his own membership within the surveyed community.
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Record #:
34442
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McCrorey Heights is a neighborhood of about two-hundred ranch-style homes in northwest Charlotte where many of the major local civil rights accomplishments were born. Development and road construction threatens McCrorey Heights and the area’s history, while displacing many of the residents in the neighborhood.
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Record #:
34450
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North Carolina civil rights lawyer John Wheeler was an advocate for equal employment opportunity in government positions and the advancement of Black Americans. His work directly influenced national employment legislation, and Wheeler himself served on various state and national committees. Despite his involvement in national civil rights, Wheeler remains elusive in modern historical studies. This article discusses Wheeler’s background and career as a banker, lawyer, and civil rights advocate, emphasizing his contributions to the President’s Committee on Equal Employment Opportunity.
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Record #:
36976
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Lau is a folklorist who studied African American shape note singing and helped found the Pauli Murray Project, an organization created to combat social inequalities and injustice.