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6 results for Civil rights--North Carolina
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Record #:
12221
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Editorial opinions regarding the Supreme Court ruling involving desegregation are provided for the following localities: Charlotte, Rockingham, Albemarle, Greensboro, Fuquay, Lillington, Fayetteville, Morgantown, Marion, and Aberdeen. In general, opinions are offered by the editors of local papers and are mainly against integration.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 25 Issue 18, Jan 1958, p9-10, 18, por
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Record #:
27773
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The Alamance County Sherriff Terry Johnson and his office are under investigation by US Department of Justice over allegations that his office targets Latinos in traffic stops and checkpoints. The statistics support those allegations and there are concerns over civil rights violations. The sheriff's department claim they are following the law and Alamance County is a prime drug trafficking point for cartels. The department, its leadership, their actions, and the concerns of local citizens are explored.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 29 Issue 33, August 2012, p18-21, 49 Periodical Website
Record #:
22701
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Greensboro, North Carolina became a central location for the civil rights movement in the 1960s starting with the North Carolina A&T sit-in. Within the Greensboro location, Elreta Alexander was a prominent African American attorney who advocated for civil rights through the judicial system.
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Record #:
31371
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Within the next few years, as the result of the adoption of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, is is expected that there will be changes to the patterns of employment and personal income by race and sex in North Carolina. Occupational qualifications will open up to a broader range of the population based on availability, acceptability, and adaptability.
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Record #:
34450
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North Carolina civil rights lawyer John Wheeler was an advocate for equal employment opportunity in government positions and the advancement of Black Americans. His work directly influenced national employment legislation, and Wheeler himself served on various state and national committees. Despite his involvement in national civil rights, Wheeler remains elusive in modern historical studies. This article discusses Wheeler’s background and career as a banker, lawyer, and civil rights advocate, emphasizing his contributions to the President’s Committee on Equal Employment Opportunity.
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Record #:
34451
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Many of North Carolina’s 4-H programs remained racially segregated through the 1980s despite open membership policies and legislation. This article addresses four aspects of 4-H and race—organizational inequalities, white support of black members, black activism and advocacy, and eventual racial integration of 4-H clubs.
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