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9 results for 4-H clubs--North Carolina
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Record #:
15210
Abstract:
The 4-H Clubs were formed in North Carolina in 1909 and has done extremely effective work in its campaign to improve the status of boys and girls in the rural sections of the State. At the present time there are approximately 1600 4-H clubs scattered throughout North Carolina and they carry out many interesting programs throughout the year that include camps, tours, demonstrations, and competitions.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 7 Issue 10, Aug 1939, p1, 22, f
Full Text:
Record #:
24753
Abstract:
In the early twentieth century, life in North Carolina revolved around agriculture. Schools provided extracurricular activities for students who would spend their lives farming the land by creating corn clubs, tomato clubs, Future Farmers of America, and 4-H.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 55 Issue 1, Fall 2015, p6-7, il, por
Record #:
31599
Author(s):
Abstract:
The history and development of 4-H work in North Carolina are being preserved officially by North Carolina State University archivists and state 4-H officials. Some of the historic 4-H items include the winning outfit in the 1932 State 4-H Dress Revue, craft items made at a 4-H camp in the 1930s, scrapbooks, pre-World War Two 4-H project records, photographs and artifacts from early 4-H canning and corn projects.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 9 Issue 5, May 1977, p10, il
Record #:
31655
Author(s):
Abstract:
A new 4-H camp site in Mulberry Valley, Caldwell County was a memorial gift of Mr. and Mrs. Luther Robinson of Lenoir, who lost their only two children to polio. The uniqueness of the camp lies in the fact that it will be used for primitive camping. The property was where the Robinson children were born, and has historical significance because the land once belonged to Israel Boone, a brother of Daniel Boone, from whom Mrs. Robinson is a fifth generation descendant.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 6 Issue 1, Jan 1974, p22, por
Record #:
34451
Author(s):
Abstract:
Many of North Carolina’s 4-H programs remained racially segregated through the 1980s despite open membership policies and legislation. This article addresses four aspects of 4-H and race—organizational inequalities, white support of black members, black activism and advocacy, and eventual racial integration of 4-H clubs.
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Full Text:
Record #:
35227
Author(s):
Abstract:
4-H and NC Cooperative Extension Service wanted to offer an updated facility including a HVAC-supplied auditorium/conference center. According to the author, the real value of this state of the art facility can’t be measured in the building. It’s calibrated in neighborly efforts ranging from wood donated by NC companies such as the Jordan Company Co (Mount Gilead) to the labor of love provided by carpenters from nearby Union Grove’s Amish community.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 48 Issue 5, May 2016, p26-27
Record #:
36594
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author talks about the career of Jane S. McKimmon in the creation of 4H clubs to help farm women in modern food preservation and her County Extension work.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. Vol. 46 Issue No. 2, , p28-30, il
Record #:
36310
Author(s):
Abstract:
Camp Corral in Ellerbe paid a special sort of tribute to the military: a free summer camp for children of fallen or disabled soldiers. Conceived by Golden Corral’s founder as a way to give back to the armed forces, it provides a place to befriend other children of military members, along with the traditional summer camp activities.
Record #:
38004
Author(s):
Abstract:
The 4-H Club in Johnston County is focused on wildlife conservation, with participants working to bring a better understanding of the value of wildlife and create a consciousness on the part of the farm boy and girl to the value of such a program in relation to farming, its economic value, and its recreational advantages.