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25 results for Miller, Hannah
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Record #:
9743
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Scottish and Scots-Irish immigrants settled in the state's southern Piedmont. In Mecklenburg County, they had built seven churches by 1770 which stand today; farms; and founded Davidson College. Today, the farms are largely taken over by developments, shopping centers, and highways. Miller describes one farm that has been preserved by the county.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 40 Issue 2, Feb 2008, p18-19, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
11166
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The Quilt Trail Project honors the long standing tradition of quilting in North Carolina. Grant money and private donations finance the design, construction, and installation of these decorative, highly colorful signs that depict classic and original quilt patterns. Over 200 \"quilt block\" designs are displayed on the sides of barns in Ashe, Avery, Mitchell, Madison, Yancey, and Watauga Counties.
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13123
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Hops, the plants that give beer its flavor and aroma, are receiving serious consideration for cultivation in western North Carolina. The stalks can reach a height of seventeen feet. A number of farmers in the western counties see hops as an alternative to tobacco growing.
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Record #:
14755
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Miller examines some of the boat builders' operations in the state, how they view their businesses, and prospects for the future. Most are currently enjoying good times and some are talking of expansion. Among the builders are Hatteras Yachts, Grady-White Boats, and Albemarle Boats, Inc.
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Record #:
15605
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Mary Ellen Rogers started Sea Biscuit Wildlife Shelter on Oak Island in 2007. It is the only bird rescue facility on the Atlantic Coast between Morehead City and Charleston. A normal stay is six months, and if recovered, the bird is released; otherwise, it will be used by an educational facility to teach the public about bird life. A total of 398 birds were brought to the facility in 2010.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 43 Issue 5, May 2011, p26-27, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
16016
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For years the North Carolina Division of Marine Fisheries has been building oyster reefs from Dare County on the northern coast to Brunswick County on the southern. Miller discusses how it is done and the success of the program.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 44 Issue 2, Feb 2012, p10-11, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
17713
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An educational initiative at T.C. Henderson Elementary School in western North Carolina takes science students outdoors for first-hand experience with concepts such as momentum. These educational experiences are actually improving student test scores.
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Record #:
19396
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The Dunstan chestnut is a cross between an American chestnut and a blight-resistant Chinese chestnut. The nuts have a sweet taste, especially when roasted over a charcoal fire. A small number of orchardists in the state are trying to interest people in the nuts which are high in carbohydrates and much lower in oil than many other nuts.
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Record #:
19736
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Shad have been coming up the Cape Fear River from the ocean to spawn in Harnett County for untold years before the arrival of the European settlers. The shad is a silvery, 12-to-18 inch fish, and in the 1800s large numbers were smoked and exported and their roe became sought-after caviar. Miller describes how river residents and others mark their spring arrival with fishing and festivals.
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Record #:
19932
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North Carolina fishermen and seafood dealers are feeling high competition from foreign imports. NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmosphere Administration) reports the 91 percent of the country's seafood is foreign. In 2004 Carteret County fishermen joined with restaurant owners and seafood dealers to fight back, forming Carteret Catch to promote local seafood. Others counties like Brunswick and the outer Banks soon followed.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 45 Issue 5, May 2013, p13-15, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
20722
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Sunset Beach is celebrating its 50th year. Miller describes the attractions of the beach, one being that the three-mile stretch of Sunset's sand, unlike other beach communities, has never had to resort to pumping sand to replenish it. The place began as a low-key, residential community planned by its founder, Mannon C. Gore, and it has pretty much remained that way. No structure can be higher than two stories.
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Record #:
22165
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A lack of access to high-speed internet service is an ongoing complaint among North Carolinians, especially in rural areas and smaller communities. Rural sections of the state are often bypassed by the larger cable providers--one reason being that they don't bring in enough revenue. Sixty years ago electric cooperatives brought electricity to these same areas. Now they are working to bring fast, reliable cable services to these areas. Miller describes a fiber-optic cable network that's going up across the state to bring \"the network to the unserved and underserved.\"
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 43 Issue 0, Feb 2011, p11-13, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
22172
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While many native plants elsewhere on the continent were wiped out during the Ice Age glaciers, North Carolina's huge variety of plants survived They range from lady slippers to rhododendrons to the overpowering, hold-your-nose ramp. With development spreading in the mountains, forestland habitats for these hardy Ice Age descendants are disappearing. Miller describes how grassroots efforts, some pushed by mountain-area electric cooperatives, are working to protect and perpetuate the plants.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 43 Issue 0, Aug 2011, p15-16, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
22773
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For admission purposes, most higher education institutions require students to take standardized tests. Rural North Carolina students often do not have ready access to test preparation as urban students do. Since 2012, a program called ASPIRE--ACT Supplemental Preparation in Rural Education--has successfully prepared students for standardized testing at a fraction of the price.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 47 Issue 5, May 2015, p28-29, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
23050
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As coyotes become a more prominent threat to livestock in North Carolina, a variety of guard animals--including dogs, goats, and llamas--now protect herds of cattle and sheep.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 47 Issue 6, June 2015, p16-17, il, por Periodical Website
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