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15 results for Inventors
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Record #:
10710
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As inventors try to transform bright ideas into business ventures, they can count on the Inventors' Network of the Carolinas to provide information and support.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 76 Issue 8, Jan 2009, p118-120, 122, 124, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
10772
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On November 14, 1910, M. F. H. Gouverneur, vice-president of the Tide Water Power Company, and H. M. Chase, manager of the American Chemical and Textile Coloring Company, made the only public test flight of the airplane they built on Shell Island, sometimes called Moore's Beach. More than 5,000 visitors crowded Wrightsville Beach four months earlier, when, on July 4, the pair had planned to attempt the first flight of their self-designed aircraft. Newspaper reports described the November flight, piloted by Mr. Chase, as having attained an altitude of about five feet, sustained for some distance, just long enough to demonstrate the plane's ability to fly. The event carries the distinction of being the first airplane constructed in North Carolina and owned and flown by North Carolinians.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 36 Issue 6, Aug 1968, p9, 14, il
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Record #:
13448
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James A. Hendley of Stanley is an inventor and manufacturer, holding 40 patents, including those on a machine gun belt and armored vest used during World War II. Beginning his career at 14 years old as a textile worker in Connecticut, Hedley moved to the textile firm Talon in Stanley in the 1950s.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 12, Nov 1961, p11, 14, por
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Record #:
14544
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Although North Carolina hasn't produced any Edison or Morse, the state has had some important invention and discoveries by native-born citizens just the same, such as the Gatling gun and the carbide light.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 13 Issue 24, Nov 1945, p7, 21
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Record #:
16854
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Thomas Lanier Clingman (1812-1897) was a congressman and general before and during the Civil War who turned to the art of inventing following during his post-bellum career. Clingman became interested in electrical technology and began experimenting with a light bulb designs. Documentation of his invention can be found in patent records and a series of letters exchanged between Edison and Clingman between March and December of 1879. Obviously his zirconia lamp designs did not rival Edison's breakthroughs but he does rank with many other inventors of the era for advancing the area of electrical lighting.
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Subject(s):
Record #:
20589
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Lawrence states that while North Carolina has not produced the inventors Edison, McCormick, or Morse, that the state still has had its share of inventors, including Dr. Richard J. Gatling. His inventions include a machine for planting and a steam plow created in 1867. However, the invention Gatling is known the world over for is the Gatling Gun. Druggists were inventing patent medicines like Stanback, B.C., Capudine, and Bromo Seltzer. William Rand Kenan, Jr., who had a distinguished career as a chemist and chemical engineer, was connected with the discovery of Calcium Carbide.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 13 Issue 24, Nov 1945, p7, 21
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Record #:
16112
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From 1790 to 1900, hundreds of the state's residents from across the state patented approximately 2,000 inventions. The first patent granted to a Tar Heel was in 1801 to G. F. Saltonstall of Fayetteville for his work with grain processing.
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Record #:
8290
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In 1865, after the end of the Civil War, large-scale tobacco manufacturing developed in Winston-Salem and Durham. Roberts discusses inventions that helped to change the industry. One was the Bull Jack, a machine that filled muslin bags about the size of a pack of playing cards with smoking tobacco and applied labels to the bags. Rufus Lenoir Patterson of Salem was the inventor. John Thomas Dalton invented a bow tier to automatically tie the strings on the muslin bags. James Bonsack, a Virginia teenager, invented the Bonsack machine for making cigarettes, a device that eliminated the need to roll cigarettes by hand.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 46 Issue 1, Fall 2006, p12-13, il, por
Record #:
8291
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Abstract:
Numerous inventions and scientific breakthroughs have occurred in North Carolina. Many inventors are well-known, such as the Wright Brothers, Caleb Bradham, and Richard Gatling. Others may not be widely known for a number of reasons, such as being unable to secure a patent. In 1801, G. F. Saltonstall of Fayetteville was the first North Carolinian to receive a patent. He had invented a new method of processing grain. Davis provides a timeline of North Carolina inventors and their creations from 1801 to 2005.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 46 Issue 1, Fall 2006, p1-5, il, por
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Record #:
8298
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Dr. Mike Boyette, an agricultural engineer, has been on the faculty at North Carolina State University for twenty-three years. He is an inventor and designer who works to create better farm equipment, structures, and processes. Shore describes some of his inventions.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 46 Issue 1, Fall 2006, p16-17, il
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Record #:
22586
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Jay Hutchins grew up working on gas-powered vehicles in Davie County, North Carolina but after a tour in Kuwait with the National Guard, Hutchins realized electric vehicles were the way of the future. Hutchins developed the Lektron Stelth R electric motorcycle as a start and continuing to develop motorcycles that save money in gas and do not pollute the environment.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 47 Issue 4, April 2015, p22-23, por
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Record #:
31528
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Robert Williams of Maggie Valley invented a new type of solar collector which could help alleviate the problems of excessive cost and low efficiency. Williams and his family also own the Meadowbrook Resort, where a working model of his solar collector is atop one of the greenhouses. In this article, Williams describes his invention, the solar greenhouse, and the future of solar energy.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 12 Issue 6, June 1980, p8-9, il, por
Record #:
31551
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The 100th anniversary of Thomas Edison’s invention of the incandescent electric light bulb will be observed October 21, 1979. Edison traveled a lot to promote his inventions and search for new materials. This article describes when Edison traveled to North Carolina in 1906 in search of cobalt, which he believed would reduce the excessive weight of an alkaline storage battery he had created.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 11 Issue 6, June 1979, p16-18, por
Record #:
32166
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Grady Fowler and Ben Venable of Surry County came up with an idea for an automatic egg gathering system. Their invention, called the Fowler Venable System, consists of nesting units which constitute the conveyor, the conveyor drive, and a vacuum system which cleans the conveyor after each cycle. The new system is being tested by various poultry companies, and is expected to drastically improve efficiency and work operations.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 3 Issue 7, July 1971, p8-9, il
Record #:
35811
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Before, the narrator focused on the profit and prestige generated from an invention that was mostly generator. Now, it was time to give credit to the true inventor, Bob Carson. As for the man already known for his inventive genius, Wild Bob was also known as a soul needing the Holy Spirit and nicknamed after the only type of spirit he saw fit to be filled with.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1979, p45-47