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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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5 results for Automobiles--History
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Record #:
7012
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People associate the automobile industry with northern cites, but in the early 20th-century over 100,000 automobiles were assembled in North Carolina. Turner discusses the history of the first Model A Ford Town Sedan purchased in Winston-Salem in 1931.
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Record #:
8476
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Before the automobile, wagons were the prime mode of local transportation. Wagons built in eastern North Carolina differed from those built in western North Carolina in the width of their track. Owing to the rough terrain, western buggies had a width of only fifty-four inches; those in the east had a width of sixty inches. Buggies that went on roads outside of their region experienced rough rides. This was rarely a problem, however, as few North Carolinians took their buggies far away from home. The automobile changed things. The first mass-produced cars, such as the Ford Model-T, came with a sixty-inch tread option, but by 1916, all cars were manufactured with a fifty-four-inch tread. This caused a lot of damage to roads in eastern North Carolina until the paving campaigns of the 1920s and 1940s.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 2, July 1983, p14, il
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Record #:
29515
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Porsche by Design: Seducing Speed tells the Porsche story by rolling 22 of the most rare and significant Porsche automobiles into the Museum for a 14-week exhibition. The exhibit showcases the beauty of Porsche’s aerodynamic designs and showcases the links between engineering and style. The exhibition s previewed by discussing the speed, capabilities, and design features of 13 of the models.
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Preview (NoCar Oversize N 715 R2 A26), Vol. Issue , Fall 2013, p8-13, il
Record #:
31076
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Steve Stillwell, of Huntersville, North Carolina, organized the American Austin Bantam Car Club’s 43rd national meeting in the Lake Norman area. Owners of these tiny antique automobiles came together for a car showing and to learn about car restoration. This article provides a history of the Austins’ and Bantams’ car manufacturing, and Stillwell’s experience in restoring several of the original models.
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Record #:
35811
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Before, the narrator focused on the profit and prestige generated from an invention that was mostly generator. Now, it was time to give credit to the true inventor, Bob Carson. As for the man already known for his inventive genius, Wild Bob was also known as a soul needing the Holy Spirit and nicknamed after the only type of spirit he saw fit to be filled with.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1979, p45-47