NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


20 results for Poultry industry
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 2
Next
Record #:
1207
Author(s):
Abstract:
The poultry industry in North Carolina ranks No. 1 in the United States in turkey production; the annual North Carolina Turkey Festival held every September in Raeford promotes and celebrates the poultry industry.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 61 Issue 4, Sept 1993, p30-32, por
Full Text:
Record #:
2309
Abstract:
Between 1970 and 1993, state broiler and turkey production grew in value and volume. Nationally, the state ranks first in turkey and fourth in broiler production. Statewide in 1993, poultry and commercial eggs were over 30% of the agricultural market.
Source:
Record #:
2310
Author(s):
Abstract:
In addition to over 10,000 workers employed in poultry production in 1993, the industry also affects the state's economy by supporting over 42,000 workers in such areas as processing, wholesale and retail trade, and transportation.
Source:
Subject(s):
Record #:
3496
Author(s):
Abstract:
Problems facing broiler producers who use dry litter waste disposal systems include a reduction in acreage of crops using it; its high concentration of zinc and copper, which can make soil toxic to plants; and competition for markets by wastewater sludge.
Record #:
10430
Abstract:
Holly Farms Poultry Industries, Inc., located in Wilkesboro, is the largest integrated broiler production organization in the state. The company began in 1947 and is one of the five largest in the nation. The article presents information on the company's development and how the chickens are processed.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 20 Issue 5, Oct 1962, p140-141, 166-167, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
12398
Author(s):
Abstract:
Not only is North Carolina the country's leading producer of turkeys, but it is also a leader in the production of broilers and eggs. The $1 billion industry passed tobacco last year as the leading moneymaker for the state's farmers.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 43 Issue 5, June 1985, p14, 16-18, 20, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
14877
Author(s):
Abstract:
Turkeys are not just for Thanksgiving and Christmas anymore. Over the past twenty years turkey growers have made North Carolina the nation's leading turkey producer, according to statistics from the NC Department of Agriculture. In 1964, 4.4 million were produced with a gross income of $17.4 million. In 1984, 30.4 million were produced with a gross income of $289.1 million.
Subject(s):
Record #:
25585
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1982, Chicken sales grosses $422 million in North Carolina. But many of the state’s 2,200 growers reaped incomes that averaged less than the minimum wage. A the same time, state agricultural officials say the poultry industry is good for the state, which is now the nation’s fourth largest producer of broiler chickens.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 2 Issue 9, May 11-24 1984, p1, 6-7, il Periodical Website
Record #:
27486
Author(s):
Abstract:
A year after a report on workers’ injuries, unfavorable contracts, and public health concerns against the poultry industry in NC, conditions have little changed. Small changes include a newsletter produced by farmers on relevant topics in the poultry growing industry, protests against processors, and pending court cases against processors for violations of OSHA. Additionally, salmonella cases are on the rise and have been linked to the poultry industry.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 8 Issue 33, August 15-21 1990, p7 Periodical Website
Record #:
27548
Abstract:
Poultry is North Carolina’s biggest crop and many residents make a living in the poultry industry. However, many of those workers and farmers who supply the chickens claim the chickens are treated better by poultry companies than they are. Additionally, poultry is not as healthy as the American public believes as many are being exposed to millions of sick birds every year. The industry traps individuals in low paying jobs, exposes them to poor working conditions, and is endangering public health.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 7 Issue 20, July 20-26 1989, p6-10 Periodical Website
Record #:
28702
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina is a natural spot for converting poultry waste into power. A Farmville, NC area business called Carolina Poultry Power will convert 60,000 tons of turkey litter into steam energy to power turbines creating electricity. The details of the project and the politics which make it difficult are discussed.
Record #:
29001
Author(s):
Abstract:
American Rivers, a national conservation organization, listed North Carolina’s Neuse River as the seventh most endangered river in the United States. They blamed hog and poultry industries for contaminating the waters. Advocates are urging legislators to restore a voluntary buyout program so that water resources can recover.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 13, April 2017, p10, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
30138
Author(s):
Abstract:
With employment rates and incomes on the rise, it is expected that North Carolina will provide more un-manufactured tobacco for cigarettes than in previous years. Along with export demands for tobacco to foreign countries, there is a foreign and domestic demand for cotton continues to be increase while supplies remain steady if not slightly smaller than previous years. Although there has been an increase in hatcheries for November, boiler prices have led to a decrease in demand for baby chicks. And North Carolina's hog crop is estimated to increase 4% over last year, a 14% increase above the 10 year average.
Record #:
30783
Author(s):
Abstract:
A new poultry inspection act requires all poultry products moving between states after January 1, 1959 to be federally inspected. This act plays into the hands of North Carolina, as more demand for cut and packed poultry will require more labor, one of the state's greatest resources.
Subject(s):
Record #:
31096
Author(s):
Abstract:
An airborne virus known as LT (laryngotracheitis) can spread fast through chickens, causing breathing problems, underweight birds and death. The virus is not contagious to humans but can cause poultry farmers tremendous financial losses. Randolph Electric Membership Corporation took extra precautions when checking electric meters to prevent the disease from spreading in Asheboro, North Carolina.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 36 Issue 8, Aug 2004, p24, il, por