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8 results for Cotton
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Record #:
56
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Abstract:
The entire issue discusses the cotton crop of 1991.
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Subject(s):
Record #:
4908
Author(s):
Abstract:
While tobacco was a billion dollar crop in 2000, its future remains uncertain. Meanwhile, cotton, North Carolina's number two crop, is closing in on the top spot. In 2000, 1.45 million bales were produced, a 71 percent increase from 1999, and revenues were $417 million, a 78 percent increase from 1999. Cotton is popular with farmers because of the stability of its price and because there is no limit in the amount that can be grown.
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Record #:
21550
Author(s):
Abstract:
During the early 20th century, cotton-seed crushing mill owners in eastern North Carolina depressed the price of seeds by adopting a variety of tactics. After antitrust suits destabilized the seed pools and direct price agreements, the mill owners exchanged price information through private means until that came under legal attack. To combat more litigation, they began full publication of price information, which was ruled to not be an unfair trade practice by the US Supreme Court.
Source:
North Carolina Historical Review (NoCar F251 .N892), Vol. 67 Issue 4, Oct 1990, p411-437 , il, por, map, f Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Record #:
24232
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Abstract:
John McNairy and Felix Harvey run the oldest business in the North Carolina 100. Harvey Enterprises Inc. in Lenoir County owns four cotton gins and buys, stores, and sells cotton. This article discusses the history of the company and the family who started it.
Record #:
30102
Author(s):
Abstract:
There is a problem with the cotton industry in the southern states: it must make up its mind whether to have a high price for cotton with a smaller market, or a lower price with a larger market. It is argued that there are four approaches to the solution of the problem. The first would be to hold all cotton produced for parity prices, or a specific level. The second argues for a level price for domestic consumption but world prices for export. The third utilizes world prices based on unrestricted competition or international agreements, while the fourth solution looks at a complete reconversion of the south's cotton program.
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Subject(s):
Record #:
30138
Author(s):
Abstract:
With employment rates and incomes on the rise, it is expected that North Carolina will provide more un-manufactured tobacco for cigarettes than in previous years. Along with export demands for tobacco to foreign countries, there is a foreign and domestic demand for cotton continues to be increase while supplies remain steady if not slightly smaller than previous years. Although there has been an increase in hatcheries for November, boiler prices have led to a decrease in demand for baby chicks. And North Carolina's hog crop is estimated to increase 4% over last year, a 14% increase above the 10 year average.
Record #:
31215
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina’s planted cotton acreage is at the highest level since 1937. While the rise in production is credited in part to improved marketing and promotion, the cotton textile industry is migrating overseas. Wes Morgan, owner of Rolling Hills Gin in Stanly County, discusses his business, and the history and future of the state’s cotton industry.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 34 Issue 10, Oct 2002, p25-27, il, por
Record #:
36276
Author(s):
Abstract:
The silent killer for decades in the farming industry is nematodes. Possibly ridding plants of this microscopic roundworm by 2020 is the root knot nematode experiment. This research project, backed by the Gates Foundation, is being undertaken by AgBiome, a biochemical company in Durham.