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38 results for Farmers and farming
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Record #:
22055
Abstract:
State farmers are developing new products from longtime crops to attract customers and increase their income. For example, Covington Spirits, based in Snow Hill, makes vodka purchased from locally grown sweet potatoes, mostly from nearby Ham Produce Company, which supplies them to the distiller in a pureed process Hams helped to develop. A number of farmers are cutting out the middle man and packaging their own harvest for the marketplace, thereby putting more money into their own pockets.
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Record #:
23146
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Due to the rise in agritourism and the desire to purchase food directly from the source, some farms in North Carolina now operate stores on their land. The Agers family in Buncombe runs a store, allows guests to pick berries, and offers guided tours of their farm.
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Record #:
24137
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Michael Jones used to manage factory hog farms but turned to smaller farming methods that humanely raise hogs that taste better and are hormone free.
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24188
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Demand for ethanol, distilled from corn, is soaring as a fuel to reduce dependency on foreign oil. The author discusses how farmers are capitalizing on the rising need for corn.
Record #:
24191
Abstract:
North Carolina grows the most sweet potatoes than anywhere else in the States. One farmer, George Wooten, discusses how his sweet potato business has grown over the years.
Record #:
28056
Abstract:
The Crop Mob is a group of farmers without farms who spend one Sunday each month helping out on small farms in rural Orange and Chatham counties. The group has been a part of why the number of small farms in the Triangle area has increased over the last decade. The group is made of mostly young farmers and activists and the group has gained national attention for their work.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 26 Issue 42, October 2009, p35-36 Periodical Website
Record #:
28490
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The Mount View Farm near Chapel Hill, NC has been a part of the Neville family since 1756. The history this farm and several other Bicentennial and Century Farms across North Carolina are detailed. Family members discuss the importance of the farms to their families and their identities.
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Record #:
28526
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Fading D Farm is the only water buffalo farm and creamery in North Carolina. Owners David and Faythe DiLoreto started a herd to make the rare and coveted Mozzarella di Bufala cheese after they could not find a place which sold it near their home in Rowan County. The couple talks about their farm and creamery, the work they do to raise the animals and make the cheese, and how they got started in the business.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 48 Issue 10, October 2016, p18-19
Record #:
28482
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After the second major flood brought on by a hurricane in 20 years, North Carolina farmers are attempting to come back once again. The story of how the Tyner family in Wilson County, NC are recovering highlights the struggles faced by many area farmers after the flooding from hurricane Matthew.
Record #:
28316
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Abstract:
Mike Jones of Franklin County owns a small farm which raises free-range, natural, and humanely raised hogs. Jones began working with confinement hog farms, but says his conscience prevented him staying in that industry. Jones’ biggest challenge is raising enough hogs to make money while keeping them from damaging their environment. Jones also works as an extension specialist for NC A&T University and encourages other farmers to use sustainable farming practices.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 38, September 2007, p28-29 Periodical Website
Record #:
28502
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Union County mother and educator Annemarie Bretz and her husband Shannen recently invested in a hobby farm. While they have no plans to give up their day jobs, they and their daughters are already enjoying the benefits of farm living and growing fruits and vegetables for themselves.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 48 Issue 6, June 2016, p6
Record #:
28544
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The father of commercial blueberry farming in North Carolina is Harold Graham Huntington. In 1928 before his arrival to NC, blueberries only grew in the wild. By 1939, his Pender County blueberry farm was the largest in the world. Huntington is also responsible for the strains of blueberries which grow best in the state today. Huntington’s history of farming and his involvement in the blueberry industry are detailed.
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Record #:
28552
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In late spring, summer and fall, numerous farm operations in North Carolina are open for visitors, as well as for annual tours and events. Diverse forms of agritourism offer a way for farmers to teach people about food production and the importance of family farms.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 49 Issue 4, April 2017, p16-18, por
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Record #:
28998
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A new documentary film produced in part by Pittsboro-based Rural Advancement Foundation International (RAFI) explores the sense of desperation that many chicken farmers experience in North Carolina. The film delves into the lives of the farmers, explaining how a handful of poultry companies take advantage of the farmers they rely on.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 12, April 2017, p23, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
29320
Abstract:
Peanut farmers in Virginia and North Carolina have experienced rough seasons of uncertain weather and uncertain prices. North Carolina is a top peanut-producing state, but its peanut harvest fell by about forty-percent in 1980. After last fall’s drought, farmers are also short on seeds and continue the struggle to stay in business.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 9 Issue 4, Apr 1981, p46-54, il, por