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11 results for Animal waste
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Record #:
1330
Author(s):
Abstract:
The N.C. Soil and Water Conservation Commission has adopted temporary guidelines for implementing the state's non-discharge rule as it applies to animal waste management operations.
Record #:
2808
Author(s):
Abstract:
Environmental groups, including the Pamlico-Tar River Foundation, held the N.C. Hog Summit in New Bern in the spring of 1996 to discuss the impact of hog waste on the environment. A partial list of recommendations is included.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 15 Issue 3, Spring 1996, p1-4, il
Record #:
3496
Author(s):
Abstract:
Problems facing broiler producers who use dry litter waste disposal systems include a reduction in acreage of crops using it; its high concentration of zinc and copper, which can make soil toxic to plants; and competition for markets by wastewater sludge.
Record #:
34213
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Agricultural Cost Share Program helped install twice as many animal waste management structures in 1992 as it had in any previous year. The increase can be attributed to farmers anticipating implementation of new nondischarge regulations, and pressure on farmers to make their animal operations environmentally sound.
Record #:
34215
Author(s):
Abstract:
In December 1992, the North Carolina Environmental Management Commission adopted revisions to rules governing waste treatment systems that do not discharge to surface waters. The rules require that animal production operations above specified sizes file with the Division of Environmental Management certification that they have obtained and implemented approved plans for managing their waste.
Record #:
34219
Author(s):
Abstract:
At its May 19 meeting, the North Carolina Soil and Water Conservation Commission approved sending to public hearing procedures and guidelines for implementing the “nondischarge” rules for animal waste systems. The commission was directed to adopt implementation rules after swine producers objected to proposed procedures that would have allowed local Soil and Water Conservation District Boards to certify animal waste management plans.
Record #:
34238
Author(s):
Abstract:
In an update of a 1991 study, scientists at North Carolina State University report that counties in the Piedmont and Coastal Plan produce more nutrients in animal waste than the crops grown in the counties can take up. The Extension Service will begin discussions with livestock producers about the need to consider dispersing livestock operations to prevent nutrient “saturation” or containment in localized areas.
Record #:
34237
Author(s):
Abstract:
At its June 8 meeting the North Carolina Environmental Management Commission approved proceeding to rulemaking on several surface water reclassification proposals, amendments to air quality permit exemptions, watershed protection rules. The commission will investigate the feasibility of new rules to require self-monitoring and reporting by operators of animal waste systems.
Record #:
34251
Author(s):
Abstract:
As the swine industry continues to expand in North Carolina, questions have arisen about the ability of current animal waste management practices to protect surface waters from pollution by nitrogen from increasing volumes of swine waste. Dr. Stephen Whalen of the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill is conducting research aimed at identifying best management practices that will promote the conversion of complex nitrogen compounds in swine waste to benign dinitrogen gas.
Record #:
34248
Author(s):
Abstract:
On May 1, the North Carolina Soil and Water Conservation Commission adopted new technical standards for animal waste systems. Changes to the standards include the requirements that all future lagoons have emergency spillways, all lagoons be precharged, a trench be dug to investigate for tile drains, and liners be continually inspected to insure proper compaction and permeability.
Record #:
34261
Author(s):
Abstract:
Located about eight miles south of the North Carolina State University campus in Raleigh are the new facilities of the Animal and Poultry Waste Management Center. The university and its partners are building and equipping waste processing and composting buildings that will help to find solutions to environmental problems associated with animal agriculture. New research, products, and technology hold promise for controlling odor and nutrient output.