NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


11 results for Swine
Currently viewing results 1 - 11
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
2385
Author(s):
Abstract:
Since 1989, the state has risen from seventh to second place in hog production. In 1994, the industry produced over $1,000,000,000 in live hogs and 25,000 full-time jobs.
Source:
North Carolina State Economist (NoCar HD 1401 T34), Vol. Issue , June 1995, p1-2, 4, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
2522
Author(s):
Abstract:
Inattention to swine waste lagoons of the state's proliferating hog industry resulted in spills in 1995 that damaged the environment. State government reaction has been minimal.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 15 Issue 1, Fall 1995, p5-6, il, bibl
Record #:
2808
Author(s):
Abstract:
Environmental groups, including the Pamlico-Tar River Foundation, held the N.C. Hog Summit in New Bern in the spring of 1996 to discuss the impact of hog waste on the environment. A partial list of recommendations is included.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 15 Issue 3, Spring 1996, p1-4, il
Record #:
2975
Author(s):
Abstract:
Because large-sized industrial hog farms are still considered \"family farms\" under the law, county governments have difficulty regulating them. A new approach of control, enacting health ordinances, is proving effective.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 15 Issue 4, Summer 1996, p1-2, il
Record #:
3628
Author(s):
Abstract:
Cooperation between the New Zealand government and the pork industry resulted in more effective swine waste management practices. Consideration of such practices could provide ways to improve hog waste management in the state.
Full Text:
Record #:
4042
Author(s):
Abstract:
Early colonists brought hogs along for food. Until the Civil War, hogs were raised for home use and selling out-of-state. After the war, Midwestern farmers captured the pork market, and N.C. hog sales declined. It was not until the 1970s that hog-raising became big business and a major economic and environmental concern. Today hogs in the state outnumber people two to one.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 38 Issue 1, Fall 1998, p31-32, il
Record #:
5937
Abstract:
The article discusses the design and operation of swine waste lagoons and the use of waste as an agricultural fertilizer. The role of the North Carolina Division of Water Quality is also discussed.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 22 Issue 3, Summer 2003, p9, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
8003
Author(s):
Abstract:
Mike Williams, director of the Animal and Poultry Waste Management Center at North Carolina State University, discusses what is wrong with the way hog waste is currently handled and what alternatives are available. He found five that work well enough, but they're all too expensive.
Full Text:
Record #:
25264
Author(s):
Abstract:
The court system has upheld the trial court’s dismissal of the Waterkeeper Alliance’s legal effort to combat hog factory pollution. Robin Greenwald explains why the case was dismissed.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 22 Issue 1, Winter 2003, p6, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
25328
Abstract:
The Pamlico-Tar River Foundation and North Carolina Riverkeepers point out the flaws of the current legislation and methods for hog farmers to prevent drainage of waste into the rivers.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 27 Issue 4, Winter 2009, p4
Record #:
25324
Author(s):
Abstract:
Riverkeeper Heather Jacobs lists some suggestions for legislation restricting the spraying of liquid manure on fields before a tropical storm.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 27 Issue 3, Fall 2008, p6, il
Subject(s):