NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


10 results for Pork industry and trade
Currently viewing results 1 - 10
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
1177
Abstract:
Annabelle Lundy Fetterman has taken over for her father as chairman and CEO of Clinton-based Lundy Packing Co., the state's largest hog processing company.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 51 Issue 8, Aug 1993, p8-11, por
Record #:
1225
Abstract:
Recent trends in the pork industry in North Carolina suggest that the state will become the second largest hog-producing state by 1995.
Source:
Record #:
1445
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1993, North Carolina was the third ranking pork producer in the nation, up from twelfth in 1965. Sound business practices and verticle integration, such as Carroll's Foods, Inc.'s 1986 alliance with Virginia-based packer Smithfield Foods, Inc., allowed for the industry's growth.
Record #:
3628
Author(s):
Abstract:
Cooperation between the New Zealand government and the pork industry resulted in more effective swine waste management practices. Consideration of such practices could provide ways to improve hog waste management in the state.
Full Text:
Record #:
4042
Author(s):
Abstract:
Early colonists brought hogs along for food. Until the Civil War, hogs were raised for home use and selling out-of-state. After the war, Midwestern farmers captured the pork market, and N.C. hog sales declined. It was not until the 1970s that hog-raising became big business and a major economic and environmental concern. Today hogs in the state outnumber people two to one.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 38 Issue 1, Fall 1998, p31-32, il
Record #:
21856
Abstract:
This article examines the importance of pork to the diet of residents of eastern North Carolina. Beginning in colonial North Carolina and continuing to current times, pork continues to be a tradition of the eastern North Carolina.
Source:
Record #:
27734
Abstract:
A field guide to pork rinds, cracklin, and chicharrons. The different kinds of pork rinds, how they are made, their history, and where you can find them in the Triangle area are explored. Their popularity has increased lately with the new trend in dieting. The wash pot style, pork rinds, crackin, fried cracklin, and fat back are all described and detailed. JP Trostle is both illustrator and author.
Source:
Record #:
27823
Author(s):
Abstract:
Smithfield, NC’s Johnston County Hams pork products are known as some of the best in America. The company specializes in cured hams and other meats and their history is explored. Their methods for curing are also detailed, along with the positive feedback from customers nationwide.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 28 Issue 52, December 2011, p21 Periodical Website
Record #:
40617
Author(s):
Abstract:
Profiles of products like timber and pork, along with statistics showing its international trade potential, help explain North Carolina’s number eleven ranking among exporting states in the US.