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12 results for North Carolina--Social life and customs
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Record #:
4410
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Abstract:
The 20th-century brought new ways to the state's citizens. Many enjoyed the new \"soft\" drinks, like Pepsi, or drank mineral water for their health. Newly completed railroad lines opened the state to all classes of people. Vacations were no longer the province of the rich; trips to the mountains, beaches, or mineral springs were available to all. People also turned to new sports, like football and baseball, for leisure-time amusement.
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Record #:
6250
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George Holt is the director of the North Carolina Office of Folklife Programs. In this TAR HEEL interview he discusses what folklife and its appreciation in North Carolina is all about in the modern world. It is more than simple nostalgia, romance, or good times; it represents a total set of values and the image one has of oneself.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 3, May/June 1978, p12-13, 15-18, por
Record #:
8478
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North Carolinians have always had a sense of humor and a desire to join clubs. Billy Arthur describes some of the state's historic lighthearted organizations, such as the Wilmington Whistling Society, the Cheerful Chitterling Chewers Club of Winston-Salem, the Calico Club of Washington, the Carolina Marriage Association of Charlotte, and the Squirrel Feeders Club of Raleigh. Many humorous clubs still exist today, such as the Bald-Headed Men of America from Morehead City and the I Could Kick Myself Brotherhood of Tarboro. Vance County's Ugly League only requires its members to be naturally ugly. Once open only to men, the club began allowing female members in 1982.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 2, July 1983, p17, por
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Record #:
10688
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By the early 1800s, summer resorts had become very popular in the South, especially those with natural springs considered to be curative. One of the most famous North Carolina springs was the Rockingham Mineral Springs, later known as Lenox Castle. Visitors came from as far away as Georgia and Alabama, and cabins were built near the spring to accommodate visitors. Around 1800, John Lenox, an eccentric land speculator and promoter, purchased the springs and began advertising it in Raleigh newspapers as Lenox Castle or The Castle of Thundertonstrench.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 37 Issue 7, Sept 1969, p12-13, 24, il
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Record #:
19315
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In the late mid to late 19th century, many North Carolinians vacationed at one of several hotels built near mineral springs. One of the grandest of them all was the White Sulphur Springs Hotel, built in Surry County by Rufus Roberts. Governors, world-famous actresses, and people from the eastern part of the state came there. They didn't come for the fancy accommodations or great food, rest or relaxation. They came to drink the mineral spring waters which were reputed to have curative powers. Tomlin recounts the hotel's history and what eventually happened to it.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 10, Mar 2013, p44-46, 48, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
24500
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The North Carolina Folklife Institute (NCFI) began in 1974 to support the North Carolina Folklife Festival. The history of NCFI demonstrates how public practice of folklore has furthered human understanding of what folklore is and what kind of impact it can make in worldwide communities. Folklorist and historian, Elijah Gaddis details ways in which the institute can construct a sustainable public folklore practice for the future.
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Record #:
24603
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North Carolinians have a distinct accent, although there are many different dialects. Author and North Carolina native, Susan Stafford Kelly takes on the task of describing the Southern word pronunciation without using traditional linguistic terms.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 4, September 2014, p111-112,114, 116, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
24599
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North Carolina’s state dance is the Carolina Shag. Shag dancing originated in the 1920s and was perfected during the 1930s and 1940s Swing Era. Carolinians gave it their own flavor by transforming it into a beach dance, resulting in the Carolina Shag.
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Record #:
24602
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In 2014, Elon University conducted a poll to discover what makes North Carolina unique. The results reveal that North Carolina is a rather moderate state, in terms of how residents describe it.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 4, September 2014, p96-98, 100, 102-104, 106, 108-109, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
24749
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North Carolina and the United States at large face the problem of unaccompanied minors who have immigrated from Central America to the United States over the past two decades. Many of these children do not receive proper education or medical care due to legislation and pushback. This article brings to light the struggles of these individuals and their present situation.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 32 Issue 48, December 2015, p12-13, 15-16, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
38339
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The author discusses how private burials were illegal in the colony; the law required at least three or four persons to witness the funeral of a deceased person. He describes funerals as being festive affairs, with large amounts of food and drink being served. Some people called for fugality. Clearly the high cost of dying was a recognizable problem in the colonial era as it is today.