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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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10 results for Food preparation
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Record #:
15359
Abstract:
Eating habits in North Carolina have changed over the years. For example, the heavy Southern breakfast of the past has all but disappeared from today's breakfast table. Grimes compares what was served in the past with what is served today in the state.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 2 Issue 25, Nov 1934, p12, 27, il
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Record #:
24386
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Abstract:
Preparing meals for airline passengers is big business. Sky Chefs Inc., one of the nation’s largest airline catering companies, serves flights departing from Raleigh Durham International Airport.
Record #:
27734
Abstract:
A field guide to pork rinds, cracklin, and chicharrons. The different kinds of pork rinds, how they are made, their history, and where you can find them in the Triangle area are explored. Their popularity has increased lately with the new trend in dieting. The wash pot style, pork rinds, crackin, fried cracklin, and fat back are all described and detailed. JP Trostle is both illustrator and author.
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Record #:
28165
Abstract:
The brick smokehouse built in 1847 behind the Attmore-Oliver House in New Bern has contributed to the interpretation of the house and social life history. People had a smokehouse because it was used to prepare ham, a resource which represented the peak of gentrified high status. Brick was used to reduce the incident of fire and also reduce stealing.
Record #:
29732
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Abstract:
Living Web Farms is one of many farms and agri-businesses in Western North Carolina focused on providing practical education and inspiration to help people understand how to tend to both the land and themselves. They provide food to the hungry and teach classes in farming, food preparation, and the creation of alternative energy sources.
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Record #:
31478
Author(s):
Abstract:
Some of our favorite foods come from old techniques to make cheaper meats better.
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Record #:
35356
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A retelling of the author’s first experience seeing souse meat, and the explanation of what it is and how it was prepared.
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Record #:
35380
Author(s):
Abstract:
When the weather turned cold enough, the annual hog killing would start, which was a full day’s work for the slaves.
Record #:
36524
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author describes the large amount of preparation to took long ago to cook food.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. Vol. 46 Issue No. 2, , p11-13, il
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Record #:
36334
Author(s):
Abstract:
Usually an accompaniment to barbecue, hash, a food mostly native to South Carolina, is basically a stew made with meat and vegetables, but the base broth varies widely dependent on the individual. The best agreed upon time to make hash, however, is by the light of a full moon.