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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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44 results for Wildlife
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Record #:
5064
Author(s):
Abstract:
As the state's population grows and urban sprawl continues, contact between wildlife and city life is inevitable. Hajian discusses what towns like Biltmore Forest and Nags Head are doing to deal with the problem.
Source:
Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 51 Issue 6, June 2001, p11, il
Record #:
21728
Abstract:
Stretching from the mountains to the coast, the state contains a diversity of wildlife and habitat. This includes the American alligator, the Southern flying squirrel, and elk herds. Brotak states that analyzing the climate of a particular region requires a close look at temperature and precipitation. \"These two elements to a large extent control the type of vegetation found in an area and therefore also determine the wildlife found there.\" The article includes maps showing normal precipitation and normal mean temperatures from 1971-2000.
Record #:
23922
Author(s):
Abstract:
The number of wildlife-related plane accidents is on the rise in both North Carolina and the United States at large. Birds are the most common animals involved in such accidents, but land-bound animals often wander onto runways and create obstacles for pilots.
Record #:
24025
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Abstract:
York recounts his experience with a particularly daring elk in the Great Smokey Mountains. The wildlife photographer found himself on the receiving end of an aggressive animal.
Record #:
24090
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The Nature Center in Asheville has been in operation for 39 years and has a plan to create a larger wildlife park by 2020. The author presents the successes and future plans of the habitat.
Record #:
25318
Author(s):
Abstract:
Matt Little explains that one should always look carefully while out on the river as you might see some unexpected wildlife.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 27 Issue 1, Spring 2008, p9
Record #:
26559
Author(s):
Abstract:
Wildlife species have adapted many strategies to survive the cold and snow, but the key to winter survival is the food supply available to them. Winter is also nature’s way of culling the weak animals from the population to maintain health and resilience.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 36 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1989, p12, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
26620
Author(s):
Abstract:
Dead trees, also known as snags, are sources of firewood but also provide habitat for wildlife in North Carolina. One suggestion is to cut a two-year supply of firewood, leaving green wood for the second year.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 35 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 1988, p21
Subject(s):
Record #:
26643
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina is losing a lot of traditional farm land because farmers can’t afford to stay in business. In the past, small-game has been a natural by-product of agriculture since most farm land provides habitat for small animals. As farm losses continue, so do small-game populations.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 34 Issue 6, Nov/Dec 1987, p6, il
Record #:
9829
Author(s):
Abstract:
Over the last 50 years, North Carolina moved from a rural state with a population of 3 and one-half million to a growing urbanized one of 6 million. At the same time some wildlife populations, like the whitetail deer, have grown. WILDLIFE IN NORTH CAROLINA asked representatives from sportsmen's groups, universities, government and industry to project what may lie ahead for the state's wildlife in the next 50 years.
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Record #:
26883
Author(s):
Abstract:
In North Carolina and across the nation, water supplies are in fast decline due to contaminated supplies, inefficient irrigation practices, and polluted groundwater. Plants and animals are even more vulnerable than humans to pollution and water deficits. Thus, wildlife can no longer be left to fend for itself where water is concerned.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 29 Issue 2, Feb 1982, p10
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Record #:
26901
Author(s):
Abstract:
A survey conducted by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service found that Americans engaged in one or more forms of outdoor recreation involving wildlife in 1980. Fishing and hunting were preferred activities, but many sportsmen indicated they also pursued non-consumptive wildlife activities.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 29 Issue 7, July 1982, p3, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
4590
Author(s):
Abstract:
As the state of North Carolina moves into the twenty-first century, Nickens takes a look back through the centuries at how humans interacted with the state's wildlife, from 1524, when Verrazano sailed along the coast, to the restoration of the wild turkey in 1999.
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Record #:
27086
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Several films at the Full Frame Documentary Film Festival in Durham delve into the complex beauty of wildlife, using animals as mirrors for society and measuring up the arbitrary line we’ve drawn between being nature’s caretakers and inhabitants.
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Record #:
22611
Abstract:
The newly opened Bodie Island Lighthouse, on the North Carolina Outer Banks, is a fifteen acre site that is home to not only the light house and and old keeper's residence, but also a variety of wildlife such as snakes, heron, ibis, deer, and otters.