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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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20 results for Recreation
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Record #:
23145
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Lexington, North Carolina mayor, Newell Clark discusses his workout routine, diet, and how the community became involved in his recreational activities.
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Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 65 Issue 2, March/April 2015, p31-34, il, por
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Record #:
24848
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This instructional guide explores why older adults should regularly ride a bike. The instructions also include where to buy a bike, what to buy with it, and advice for riding a bike around town. Safety tips for bike riding are also included.
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Subject(s):
Record #:
26408
Author(s):
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Despite the winter weather in North Carolina, there are still opportunities for people to get outdoors and stay committed to conservation. State parks and recreation areas offer winter programs in birding, hiking, and nature observation.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 44 Issue 1, Winter 1996, p2-4, il, por
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Record #:
26414
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The line between outdoor recreation and conservation is complicated. Fly-fishing and bird hunting are popular outdoor activities in North Carolina, but one should remember that they have an impact on natural resources.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 42 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1994, p5, il
Record #:
26901
Author(s):
Abstract:
A survey conducted by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service found that Americans engaged in one or more forms of outdoor recreation involving wildlife in 1980. Fishing and hunting were preferred activities, but many sportsmen indicated they also pursued non-consumptive wildlife activities.
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Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 29 Issue 7, July 1982, p3, por
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Record #:
26751
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The future of hunting and other forms of outdoor recreation was the topic at the first North Carolina Conference on Outdoor Ethics, sponsored by the N.C. Wildlife Federation in late September. Representatives from conservation groups, landowners, and government agencies discussed ways of improving the image of outdoor users and increasing educational efforts.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 31 Issue 6, Nov/Dec 1984, p3, por
Record #:
26820
Author(s):
Abstract:
Four conservation summits will be held by the National Wildlife Federation this summer, each featuring a week of outdoor adventure, environmental awareness activities, and a chance to learn new recreational skills. The summits will be held in parks in the Blue Ridge Mountains, Rockies, Adirondacks, and near Lake Michigan.
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Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 28 Issue 6, June 1981, p14, por
Record #:
26830
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Abstract:
The North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission is trying to resolve problems of outdoor abuse. Problems with littering and conflicts with fishermen are examples of common issues faced on rivers. A strict code of ethics is needed to prevent these problems for all outdoor sports.
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Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 28 Issue 7, July 1981, p9, por
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Record #:
28518
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Abstract:
A popular trend in recreation sports these days is to take an old activity and put a new spin on it. Throughout North Carolina, four sports that are growing in popularity include disc golf, footgolf, pickleball, and ultimate frisby.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 49 Issue 2, Feb 2017, p18-19, il, por
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Record #:
30296
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No other state in the south affords residents and visitors as much variety in recreational facilities like North Carolina. Thousands of miles of good roads allow vacationers to reach affordable opportunities within hours of any start. These opportunities include 15 state parks, fishing and hunting, athletic events, outdoor dramas, organized recreation programs, and commercial recreation.
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We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 11 Issue 6, November 1953, p44, 46, 48, 50, 126, por, map
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Record #:
30518
Author(s):
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Almost every recreational activity possible is available across North Carolina. Sport fishing in lakes and oceans, state and national parks, outdoor dramas, spectator sports, and golf are all popular activities for both tourists and residents.
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Record #:
32681
Author(s):
Abstract:
It’s a whole lot different from the game that the kids play and the old gentlemen of Franklinton have been enjoying it for a long time. Every Saturday in the road in front of the old hotel in Franklinton a group of retired men continue their 30 year old game of marbles. Unlike the version that the younger folks play, this game follows older rules and uses marbles that are not soled anymore, which are slightly smaller than billiard balls.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 14 Issue 29, Dec 1946, p3-4, il
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Record #:
34907
Abstract:
Farr Fitness in Fayetteville, North Carolina, operates out of the home of Brian and Morgan Farr. In 2015, the Farr family began inviting friends to train with them. As they formed a small community, they decided to run Farr Fitness as a free gym and Christian ministry. Over the past two years, more than 350 people have trained with the Farr’s.
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CityView (NoCar F 264.T3 W4), Vol. Issue , January/February 2017, p12-13, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
36211
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The appeal of a playhouse can be heightened by adding aspects of the outdoors. Aspects the author recommended were adding vines as a covering and window boxes for holding plants. Included were the seven steps involved in creating them for her grandchildren.
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