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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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50 results for Wildlife management
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Record #:
2883
Author(s):
Abstract:
The red wolf has been reintroduced in the state through the Red Wolf Recovery Program. The world's largest free-roaming red wolf population, about sixty, now lives on 500,000 acres in the eastern part of the state.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 63 Issue 12, May 1996, p4-5
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Record #:
3530
Author(s):
Abstract:
Wildlife populations rise and fall. For example, game animals, including deer and wild turkeys, existed in low numbers during most of the 20th-century. However, wildlife management has contributed to their remarkable recovery.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 44 Issue 3, Fall 1997, p2-6, il
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Record #:
4133
Author(s):
Abstract:
Overhunting and increasing human population brought about the decline of the wild turkey across the country from millions to around 30,000 at the start of the 20th-century. The National Wild Turkey Federation sponsors Target 2000, a project that seeks to restore the wild turkey nationwide by the year 2000. By April, 1999, the state's wild turkey population will reach 100,000, with habitats in all 100 counties.
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Record #:
4629
Author(s):
Abstract:
Some of the state's declining species, including black bear, deer, wild turkey, and bald eagle, made remarkable recoveries during the 20th-century. The challenge of the 21st-century will be to protect and conserve wildlife in a time when population, urban sprawl, and intolerance for wildlife are increasing.
Record #:
4744
Author(s):
Abstract:
Early-successional habitats are areas of a mountain forest that are beginning to recover from events like fires, storms, or logging. First come grasses, then shrubs, and finally trees. All of these stages are important to wildlife survival. Earley discusses the value of early-successional habitats for mountain wildlife, their growing rarity, and what steps are being taken to maintain them.
Record #:
4920
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Sea Turtle Protection Program, which is run by the Wildlife Resources Commission, seeks to protect sea turtle nests and hatchlings and to collect mortality data. Comer describes how the Holden Beach Sea Turtle Watch caries out this mission and how stranded, sick, and injured sea turtles are handled.
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Record #:
7147
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Abstract:
Between 1992 and 2001, in coastal waters from New Jersey to North Carolina, 210 bottlenose dolphins were killed by becoming entangled in gill nets used by fishermen. The dolphins become entangled either by accidentally running into the nets or by being caught while eating the fishing catch. Angione reports on a study funded by the North Carolina Fishery Resource Grant program to study whether acoustic alarms can keep the dolphins away from the gill nets.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Spring 2005, p24-26, il Periodical Website
Record #:
7917
Author(s):
Abstract:
Private groups are taking an increasingly active role in helping wildlife and its critical habits. Venters describes five diverse groups that are working to save the state's wildlife and environment: the North Carolina Wildlife Federation, Ducks unlimited, Trout Unlimited, the National Wild Turkey Federation, and Quail Unlimited.
Record #:
8871
Abstract:
The Wildlife Action Plan was created by the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission to address conservation needs of the state over the next decade. In this second of a five-part series, the authors discuss how the plan is being implemented in the state's mountain region.
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Record #:
9072
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Abstract:
This is the fourth in a series describing the North Carolina Wildlife Commission's game lands. These are areas open to hunting by the public during the regular season. A special games land permit is required to hunt on these managed lands. The Western Game Lands, at 655,298 acres, is one of the smaller of the state's four game lands. This area includes the Nantahala and Pisgah National Forests, Caney Fork, Green River, and Toxaway Lands, plus several tracts owned by Champion International Corporation.
Record #:
11828
Author(s):
Abstract:
Bottlenose dolphins are killed each year when they become entangled in fishermen's nets. In the Chesapeake Bay gear modifications deter dolphins from entanglement. Seiling reports on research results from a regional marine mammal study conducted in Virginia waters.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Holiday 2009, p16-19, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
18568
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Abstract:
Research conducted at the North Carolina Wildlife Resource Commission's Southeastern Focal Area (SEFA) shows that quail populations can be improved with proper wildlife management given enough land, time, and financial commitment from landowners.
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Record #:
24090
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The Nature Center in Asheville has been in operation for 39 years and has a plan to create a larger wildlife park by 2020. The author presents the successes and future plans of the habitat.
Record #:
25946
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Abstract:
State wildlife agencies are being consolidated into resources within other departments across the country. Although there has been some improvement in the process between complaints and action, some argue the moves are putting wildlife behind air and water in terms of importance.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 17 Issue 1, 1974, p3
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Record #:
26394
Author(s):
Abstract:
Wildlife populations rise and fall. For example, game animals, including deer and wild turkeys, existed in low numbers during most of the 20th-century. However, wildlife management has contributed to their remarkable recovery.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 45 Issue (44)4, Fall 1997, p2-5, il, por
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