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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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33 results for Powell, Chris
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Record #:
4582
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The North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission's 1999 waterfowl stamp and print is titled \"Green-Winged Teal at Pisgah Covered Bridge\" and was painted by North Carolina artist Robert C. Flowers. The Randolph County bridge, built in 1910, is one of only two covered bridges left in the state. Since its inception in 1983, the North Carolina Wildlife Heritage series of stamps and prints has raised over $3 million for waterfowl conservation.
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4605
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Just hours after receiving the call for help, the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission deployed 128 wildlife officers and 60 boats to help with rescue efforts during Hurricane Flood's flooding. The officers logged 7,877 man-hours and rescued over 1,000 flood victims. Officers also patrolled areas to prevent looting. In Greenville their help was critical in helping keep power on in the city.
Record #:
4611
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When floods caused by Hurricane Floyd inundated Eastern Carolina, 128 North Carolina Wildlife Enforcement officers responded to calls for help from local communities. They came with a variety of shallow-draft boats and heavy-duty patrol boats and the know-how to use them in hazardous situations. Wildlife officers rescued over 1,200 people. A number of them share their experiences of these trying days.
Record #:
4742
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Governor James B. Hunt's Million Acre initiative, which will protect a million acres over the next decade, was passed by the 2000 North Carolina General Assembly. Funding was provided for the land-preservation program which seeks to save valuable wildlife habitats and game lands from development. Provision for a Million Acre Advisory Panel to oversee the project was also included in the legislation.
Record #:
4834
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Employers would be delighted to have an employee who thoroughly loves his job, works for no salary, never even thinks about complaining of holiday work, and gives his partner 100 percent effort. Meet the dogs of the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission game law enforcement division.
Record #:
4925
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Powell discusses myths people have about prescribed burning, or the controlled burning of woodlands. One is that fire sterilizes the land; another is that animals do not know what to do in a fire. Actually fires help restore the ecosystem. Fire burning resources available to landowners include the Forest Resources Commission and private foresters.
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Record #:
5078
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Sid Baynes has retired from the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission after 31 years of service. Baynes, a North Carolina State University graduate, began his career as a wildlife biologist. In 1976, he was named chief of the Division of Conservation Education.
Record #:
5474
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The Clean Water Management Trust Fund was established by the 1996 North Carolina General Assembly. The fund monies can be used to \"acquire land or easements for riparian buffers to restore wetlands, repair failing wastewater treatment systems, and improve stormwater controls.\" Powell discusses how funds were used in the Dupont State Forest, Mitchell River, and the Edenton Bay Watershed Restoration Plan.
Record #:
5475
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North Carolina State Senator Marc Basnight talks about his brainchild, the Clean Water Management Trust Fund, and its impact on the state's environment in this WILDLIFE IN NORTH CAROLINA interview.
Record #:
3740
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For a change of pace while vacationing, families can visit a state park or wildlife refuge. A number of sites, including New River and Pea Island, provide opportunities to learn about an area's plants, animals, climate, and geology.
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Record #:
3913
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Poaching, or hunting game animals illegally, is a serious problem, with 621 arrests for night hunting in 1997 alone. Most hunters obey the law, but the few violators not only destroy wildlife but also endanger citizens and the N.C. Wildlife Commission officers who enforce the law.
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Record #:
3884
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The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission's public impoundments offer prime hunting grounds to duck hunters who can't afford private clubs or find a place to hunt. The impoundments are man-made wetlands for ducks and hunters and can be used by anyone with a hunting license. Currently the commission manages twenty-six.
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Record #:
4604
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Wisconsin Tissue plans to build a $180 million paper mill on the Roanoke River near Weldon are on hold. Chesapeake Corp. has decided to sell controlling interest in Wisconsin Tissue to Georgia-Pacific Corp. The hold is welcome news to environmentalists, biologists, and fishermen who questioned placing the mill on the river. The river's striped bass population was restored in 1997, and the mill's planned discharge of nine million gallons of wastewater per day had a potential impact on the river's resources.
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Record #:
4602
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The auditorium in the Pisgah Center for Wildlife Education near Brevard was named in honor of the late Beatrice H. Barsantee. Born in 1907, Barsantee, a resident of Hendersonville, left one-fourth of her estate to the North Carolina Wildlife Commission for the purpose of conservation education. The money helped start the center, which is now in its fifth year of educating the public about wildlife.
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Record #:
4609
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How much is a fishing season worth to local economies? A survey requested by the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission revealed that during the 1998 Roanoke River striped bass season anglers spent about $918,000. The season lasts 75 days. Local economies benefited through money spent on lodging, food, gas, and bait. Eighteen hundred questionnaires were distributed to fishermen, of which six hundred were returned.
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