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12 results for Duck shooting
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Record #:
4743
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The North Carolina Wildlife Commission's three-year experimental teal season concludes September 7-16, 2000. Bag limit is four teal per hunter per day. Whether the teal season becomes permanent depends upon hunter response. Some feel September is too early for waterfowl hunting. Continuation also depends on whether or not state guidelines for accidental and illegal harvest of other ducks are followed.
Record #:
10552
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Hunting for diving ducks in North Carolina's coastal regions has a rich history and a devoted following dating back to the 19th century. Despite an upward trend in the state, overall the population is declining. A definitive cause has yet to be found, but possible causes are habitat conditions on spring staging areas; contaminants; diseases; and hunting.
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Record #:
24845
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James Parnell tells about a new type of duck hunting that doesn’t involve a shotgun. He takes photographs of ducks as they leap out of the water to catch beautiful images rather than catching the ducks themselves.
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Record #:
26539
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A limited, controlled duck hunt will be carried out on the Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuge this fall, along with a sponsored youth hunt.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 24 Issue (27) 11, Nov 1980, p8, 9
Record #:
9684
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Since 1971-72 there has been a moratorium on hunting redhead ducks in coastal North Carolina. Core Sound is a favorite wintering ground for them, and in January 1981, there were approximately 40,000 ducks there. While these ducks are numerous to hunt again, declining nesting habitats remain a problem.
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Record #:
3884
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The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission's public impoundments offer prime hunting grounds to duck hunters who can't afford private clubs or find a place to hunt. The impoundments are man-made wetlands for ducks and hunters and can be used by anyone with a hunting license. Currently the commission manages twenty-six.
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Record #:
4785
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Many duck hunters enjoy hunting on the big salt marshes along the Carolina coast. However, good duck hunting can be found closer to home along small rivers and on beaver ponds.
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Record #:
6846
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In the early part of the 20th-century, wealthy Northern sportsmen purchased large tracts of marshland in North Carolina for use as their own private hunting preserves. Farseeing individuals on the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and other groups made purchases of waterfowl areas for public use. Powell gives a short summary of each of the following duck hunting areas: Currituck Sound, Albemarle Sound, Pamlico Sound, Lake Mattamuskeet, Pamlico River, the Piedmont, and southeastern Coastal Plain. \r\n
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Record #:
24725
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The author discusses the various methods of duck hunting, paying particular focus on the lengths the hunters go to in order to have a successful hunt. Many create intricate ‘bush blinds’ and wait in them for hours.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 17 Issue 32, January 1950, p3-6, 20, il
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Record #:
27395
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A variety of different types of blinds are used by duck hunters on the Currituck Sound to effectively and comfortably hide from ducks.
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Record #:
35832
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Starting as an anthropological study in northeastern North Carolina, the author learns about the techniques used in making and using duck decoys, as duck hunting is a large part of society. The decoys work no matter how crudely they are made, but the carvings and designs on it are symbolic of social status.
Record #:
38197
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49 years in the future, the author surmises that duck hunting will be strictly regimented and only open for a brief period of time.
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