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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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65 results for Hunting
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Record #:
4905
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In an interview with Business North Carolina, newly elected governor Mike Easley discusses a variety of issues, including campaign-finance reform in North Carolina, what he looks for in a new secretary of commerce, how to bring new jobs to rural areas and protect the environment there at the same time, and a state lottery.
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Record #:
4914
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In an interview with Steve Tuttle of NORTH CAROLINA magazine, newly-elected governor Mike Easley shares his thoughts on the Bill Lee Act, economic development in rural counties, educational priorities, and a tight budget.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 59 Issue 1, Jan 2001, p46-49, por
Record #:
12645
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The Moravians, among the first to settle in the western Piedmont, recorded their observations concerning the proliferation of game animals. Buffalo, black bear, wolves, and even panthers were observed, with elk and deer common throughout the area. Not accomplished hunters, the Moravians relied on the professional or \"long hunters\" of the frontier, while sharpening their own skills. Moravian records also reflect a consistent lack of game for hunting during the years 1752 through 1756.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 1, June 1961, p13-14, il
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Record #:
12717
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During early autumn, it is the time for the Tar Heel hunters to ready themselves for annual safaris into the tidelands for clapper rails or \"marsh hens.\" The importance of wind and tide in marsh hunting can't be overestimated, as it takes good \"grass covering\" high water to flush out the prey in order to find and shoot them.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 10, Oct 1961, p11, 24, por
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Record #:
15498
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The hunting camp of Camp Bryan is located in the lower part of Craven County and includes thirty-five thousand acres consisting of pocosin, swampland, and lakes. Camp Bryan has been a favorite hunting place of celebrities such as Babe Ruth, New York Times editor John Kieran, and novelist Rex Beach to hunt deer, bear, ducks, geese, turkeys, squirrels, raccoons, and many other animals.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 40, Feb 1936, p7, 20, f
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Record #:
15525
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The eastern part of the state is a veritable paradise for hunters and fishermen and attracts sportsmen from this state and across the nation. To add a solid measure of comfort to their trips, along with companionship with other sportsmen, a group of Carteret County men have organized the Edgewater Club. Built at a cost of $350,000, the club is near Morehead City on Bogue Banks and contains every modern device for comfort and convenience.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 2 Issue 39, Feb 1935, p11, 24, il
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Record #:
19708
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The natural bounty of Granville County nourished an agricultural industry but also supported hunting and trapping were important trades for colonists. The article reviews the men engaged in these activities, the items produced from hunting and trapping, and the values of these items in the colonial economy.
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Record #:
20290
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Zlotnicki describes the NC Wildlife Resources Commission's Game Lands Program. The program has over two million acres (including national forests) and the Commission actively manages about half a million of that. The program's primary purpose is to provide opportunities for hunting and at the same time conserve wildlife species. The Piedmont and Coastal Plains regions are highlighted.
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Record #:
24497
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North Carolina’s Wildlife Resources Commission is in the process of developing more public shooting ranges across the state. The first public range opened in 2006, but since 2012, six more have either opened or are in the planning stages. The Commission aims to create safe, readily available ranges for North Carolinians who partake in hunting and shooting sports.
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Record #:
25955
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Research has been examining objections voiced against hunting in an aim to provide dialogue between hunters and conservationists. The top reasons behind anti-hunting sentiment include endangering species and opposition to sport or trophy hunting. Understanding such sentiments can help produce better public education programs, procedures and enforcement policies.
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Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 18 Issue 3, Summer 1974, p7, il
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Record #:
25981
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Big questions in wildlife conservation are: who should pay for habitat and how should wildlife money be spent? In the 1930s and 1950s legislation put most the financial burden on hunters and fishermen through taxes on gear and licenses. But now, the Council on Environmental Quality and the US Fish and Wildlife Service are studying a proposed tax on non-hunting and non-fishing users of public wildlife lands in order to protect both game and non-game species and lands.
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Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 19 Issue 3, Summer 1975, p7
Record #:
25983
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North Carolina adopted some new legislation regarding hunting in 1975-76. Due to an increase in the deer population, NC hunters will not be able to shoot up to four in the eastern counties. The new regulations also updated the gun season for deer in certain counties between one and two weeks, while closing the season in other counties. Bow and arrow season for deer was shortened to three days. The regulations also tackled seasons for rabbit trapping, bobcats, and migratory birds.
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Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 19 Issue 3, Summer 1975, p11
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Record #:
26396
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All North Carolina migratory game bird hunters are required to have a current Harvest Information Program (HIP) certification, in addition to a valid license while hunting during the 1997 season. The new program will help state wildlife agencies develop more reliable estimates of bird populations.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 45 Issue (44)4, Fall 1997, p16
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Record #:
26427
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A recent study reveals some of the attitudes of US residents toward hunting and other activities. The public supports hunting if only for subsistence and management programs are supported even by anti-hunting groups.
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Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 24 Issue (27) 2, Feb 1980, p2, 14
Record #:
26629
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The North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission plans to ask the General Assembly to pass a bill that would increase the state’s hunting and fishing license fees. The fee increase is necessary to meet the increase in operation costs of the agency.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 34 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1987, p6
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