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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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20 results for Jenkins, Greg
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Record #:
6974
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Hurricanes in North Carolina affect people and wildlife. Hurricane Isabel, which struck eastern North Carolina in the fall of 2003, decimated the largemouth bass populations in the Roanoke and Chowan rivers. Jenkins describes the North Carolina Resources Commission's plan to restock the two rivers with 12,000 sub-adult largemouth bass. Restocking began in February 2004.
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8346
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For one hundred years, deer hunters have come to Council, North Carolina, to commune with nature and enjoy the fellowship of other outdoorsmen at the North State Game Club. The club was founded in Bladen County in 1906 by John Council, who had founded the Council Tool Company in 1886. Both the company and the club are still in operation. The club owns and leases a little over 6,000 acres for hunting in Bladen County. However, hunting is just one small part of the fun the hunters enjoy.
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10177
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With North Carolina's population predicted to rise from eight million to over twelve million by 2030, the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission is developing a long-range plan to protect the state's declining open spaces.
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Record #:
5895
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State parks in North Carolina were visited by a record 13.2 million people in 2002, according to statistics from the North Carolina Division of Parks and Recreation. This represents an increase of 5 percent over 2001 and a 160 percent increase during the last twenty years. The top park in attendance was Kerr Lake, with 1,574,188 visitors.
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Record #:
6246
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The U.S. Navy's plan to build an outlying landing field (OLF) in eastern North Carolina for jet fighters to practice aircraft carrier landings on land is drawing fire from numerous groups, both in-state and without. Since tundra swans and snow geese fly the skies in large numbers over the proposed landing area five months out of the year, safety is a major concern for wildlife, pilots, and the public. Jenkins discusses this highly controversial project.
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Record #:
6271
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The endangered Virginia big-eared bat hibernates for the winter in an abandoned Surry County iron mine. The Cranberry Iron Mine ceased operation in the mid-1960s, and the bats took up residence. To protect the bats during their hibernation, the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission has installed gates resembling farm gates over the five mine entrances.
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Record #:
6738
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The 2004 North Carolina Wildlife Commission's waterfowl stamp and art print is Gerald Putt's painting of mallards on the Butner-Falls of Neuse Game Land. Proceeds from sales of stamps and prints augment the commission's waterfowl fund. Since its inception in 1983, the program has raised over $4.2 million for waterfowl conservation.
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Record #:
6777
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Since kudzu, the so-called “plant that ate the South,” was introduced in the 1930s, other non-native fish, animals and plants are beginning to make their presence known in North Carolina. Many of the plants are Asian in origin and include Chinese silvergrass and Chinese privet. Other invasives include hydrilla and giant salvinia. Plants spread to open lands and clog waterways. Once established, they are almost impossible to remove mechanically. Fishermen sometimes move fish from one area to another in hopes of creating a new fishery, and in so doing, often create a new problem. Jenkins discusses this problem of invasives and their affect on the composition of the state's flora and fauna over the next fifty to one hundred years.
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Record #:
6748
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What goes on half a mile under the sea off the coast of North Carolina? To find out, researchers from UNC Wilmington, the U.S. Geological Survey, the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, and other interested groups are investigating deep coral reef communities off the state's coast. Three expeditions spanned six weeks in the summers of 2002, 2003, and 2004. Jenkins discusses what has been learned to date.
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6845
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On June 19, 2004, the North Carolina record for a blue catfish caught on a hook and line was broken at Lake Norman. The catfish weighed eighty-five pounds and measured 51 and one-half inches long and 35 and one-half inches in girth. The record fish was certified by a biologist with the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission. The largest blue catfish on record weighed 116.12 pounds and was caught in the Mississippi River in Arkansas.
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Record #:
6900
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Jenkins discusses the Cape Hatteras Anglers Club Annual Invitational Surf Fishing Tournament. The club organized in 1957, and the tournament began the following year. The event is held around the first weekend in November. Competition is between teams of six members each. The current number of teams is one hundred, the maximum number that will fit into the space the Park Service allows the club to use. There is a waiting list of fifty-eight teams. When one team dropped out in 2003, the team that replaced it had been waiting on the list for twelve years. Teams compete not for money, but for a replica of the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse.
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Record #:
6844
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The 2004 wild turkey spring harvest season reports a drop of 10 percent. In 2003, there were 9,862 turkeys harvested compared to 8,846 in 2004. Only thirty-four of the state's one hundred counties reported increased kills over last year. Heavy rainfall and poor turkey reproduction were contributing factors. Wilkes County was the top county for turkey kills with 365 reported.
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Record #:
7065
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Shackleford Banks is the only major North Carolina barrier island that is protected as a wilderness area and prohibits vehicles. Wild horses live on the nine-mile island. Legend says the animals are descendants of horses that survived Spanish shipwrecks. They can be documented on the island for 200 years. In 1998, Congress passed legislation requiring that the herd be at least one hundred horses and be co-managed by the National Park Service and the Foundation for Shackleford Horses. Jenkins discusses how the co-management arrangement is working.
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Record #:
6889
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Governor Michael Easley grew up on a Nash County tobacco farm in the 1950s and 1960s, where hunting and fishing was a family tradition. In this interview, Easley, who entered office in 2001, discusses how his sporting background helps to shape his thinking on conservation of the state's natural resources and public lands.
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Record #:
7196
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Of North Carolina's forty freshwater fishing records, ten were set over twenty-five years ago. These include the bluegill at four pounds, five ounces; American (white) shad at seven pounds, fifteen and one-half ounces; and the channel catfish at forty pounds, eight ounces. Scott Van Horn, head of the North Carolina Division of Inland Fisheries' Habitat Conservation Program, discusses why these forty records have stood the test of time.
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