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5 results for Animal introductions
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Record #:
5080
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Most people think of the Southwest when they heard the words \"Texas horned lizard,\" sometimes called \"horned toad.\" Once kept as pets, these creatures either escaped or were released in a variety of places nationwide. The species was first reported in North Carolina in 1880; however, no colony was documented until 1989, when a thriving one was found in Onslow County near Swansboro. The Texas horned lizard is the only reptile species successfully introduced into the state.
Record #:
10917
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The spread of nuisance aquatic species, often by humans, causes threats to the state's diverse aquatic resources. The authors list areas where invasives are occurring and make suggestions for preventing their spread.
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Record #:
24841
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Dr. Adrian Smith presents her knowledge about ants, specifically Western long-legged harvester ants. She describes some general facts about ants as well as facts more specific to her line of study. She presents the findings of research she has done involving orphan ants and what is called the ‘queen’s death mark.’
Source:
North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 24 Issue 1, Winter 2016, p4-5, il
Record #:
6777
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Since kudzu, the so-called “plant that ate the South,” was introduced in the 1930s, other non-native fish, animals and plants are beginning to make their presence known in North Carolina. Many of the plants are Asian in origin and include Chinese silvergrass and Chinese privet. Other invasives include hydrilla and giant salvinia. Plants spread to open lands and clog waterways. Once established, they are almost impossible to remove mechanically. Fishermen sometimes move fish from one area to another in hopes of creating a new fishery, and in so doing, often create a new problem. Jenkins discusses this problem of invasives and their affect on the composition of the state's flora and fauna over the next fifty to one hundred years.
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Record #:
6778
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Fishermen sometimes move fish from one body of water to another in hopes of creating a new fishery, and in so doing, often create a new problem. \"People can bring fish in by the thousands, and nine of ten times, it doesn't help or hurt anything, but that tenth time, it ruins everything,\" says David Yow, a fisheries biologist for the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission. The best advice biologists give to fishermen is to leave fish stocking to the pros. Kibler discusses what can happen when a species is introduced into waters where it doesn't belong.
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