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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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5 results for Ants
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Record #:
24841
Author(s):
Abstract:
Dr. Adrian Smith presents her knowledge about ants, specifically Western long-legged harvester ants. She describes some general facts about ants as well as facts more specific to her line of study. She presents the findings of research she has done involving orphan ants and what is called the ‘queen’s death mark.’
Source:
North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 24 Issue 1, Winter 2016, p4-5, il
Record #:
35339
Author(s):
Abstract:
Matt Ziher proposed that biomimicry, or this creature’s biologically inspired design, played a pivotal role in its survival. Characteristics of biomimicry noted were survival tactics for the ants' construction of shelter, gathering of food supply, avoidance of disease, and rearing of offspring
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Subject(s):
Record #:
35569
Author(s):
Abstract:
Two observations offered an explanation for its ability to help anglers reel in the catch of the day. One was its ability to sink slowly; the other, its resemblance to forms of aquatic insects.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 3, June/July 1973, p30-32
Subject(s):
Record #:
35428
Author(s):
Abstract:
Profiled was the North Carolina Museum of Art’s 20th Annual Bugfest, touted by the author as the single largest bug-centric event held in the United States. This article discussed the theme of that year’s event, ants. Also noted was two Museum ant experts and their NCSU colleague’s list of seven favorite ants, which included the Exploding Ant and Indian Jumping Ant.
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Subject(s):
Record #:
36197
Author(s):
Abstract:
To help draw the line between harmful or harmless insects is a description of ten, many which can be found in gardens. Harmless are pillbugs, common whitetail skimmer, bald faced hornet, and spiny back orb weaver. Destructive are harlequin bug, saddleback caterpillar, three lined potato beetle, wooly bear caterpillar, black carpenter and kudzu bug.
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