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3 results for Caterpillars
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Record #:
8733
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Abstract:
Caterpillars are not nondescript creatures just waiting around for a metamorphosis into a stunning butterfly. Many have a beauty in their own right. Givens describes several, including the spicebush swallowtail, puss moth, and the saddleback and gives tips on where to find caterpillars, such as where and when to hunt, what plants to look on, and what to look for.
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Record #:
8059
Author(s):
Abstract:
Caterpillars have an important ecological role as herbivores and as prey for numerous insects, birds, and other wildlife. There are approximately 11,000 species of butterfly and moth caterpillars in the country. Fewer than fifty species are identified as stinging caterpillars. These caterpillars do not sting in the same way a wasp or bee does. Instead, they possess specialized spines or bristles that cause a burning rash upon contact. Stinging caterpillars found in the state include the saddleback, puss moth, Nason's slug, and monkey slug.
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Record #:
36197
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To help draw the line between harmful or harmless insects is a description of ten, many which can be found in gardens. Harmless are pillbugs, common whitetail skimmer, bald faced hornet, and spiny back orb weaver. Destructive are harlequin bug, saddleback caterpillar, three lined potato beetle, wooly bear caterpillar, black carpenter and kudzu bug.
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