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8 results for Kudzu
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Record #:
5380
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Kudzu, the villainous vine of the South, is extremely hardy and resistant to many techniques to curb its growth. Tomlin discusses the work of North Carolina State University entomology professor Dr. David Orr, who is seeking a way to get rid of the pesky plant.
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Record #:
8895
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A humorous article, Pearce argues that kudzu was developed by the Japanese during the Great Depression to take over the United States.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 8, Jan 1984, p12-13, por
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Record #:
20142
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When Japanese arrowroot was introduced more than 100 years ago to flower beds and gardens across the South, no one suspected this monstrously invasive species--kudzu--would become as ubiquitous to places like North Carolina as tobacco farms and BBQ restaurants.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 3, Aug 2013, p152-154, 156, 158-159, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
24537
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The author presents a satire on how kudzu, Pueraria hunbergiana, was introduced to the United States. The author describes in this article how the Japanese sent the invasive species to America in the 1930s to weaken the country before World War II.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 45 Issue 7, December 1977, p28-29, il
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Record #:
26487
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Kudzu, an exotic vine, was introduced during the Great Depression as a ground cover to control erosion and rejuvenate soils. Now, it is taking over everything it grows on.
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Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 24 Issue (27) 8, Aug 1980, p3
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Record #:
9854
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Kudzu, the so-called “plant that ate the South,” was introduced in the 1930s. It can cover entire landscapes in lush, green foliage, and while it can control erosion and feed livestock, it is considered a pest. Geographically, it is limited by the fact that it does not tolerate cold weather well.
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Record #:
36197
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To help draw the line between harmful or harmless insects is a description of ten, many which can be found in gardens. Harmless are pillbugs, common whitetail skimmer, bald faced hornet, and spiny back orb weaver. Destructive are harlequin bug, saddleback caterpillar, three lined potato beetle, wooly bear caterpillar, black carpenter and kudzu bug.
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