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23 results for Invasive plants
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Record #:
6937
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Phragmites australis, or common reed, is a tall innocent-looking marsh plant with cane-like stems, blue-green leaves, and purplish plumes on top. However, the plant's strong anchoring roots can spread out to reproduce exponentially. The common reed's dense growth can crowd out native vegetation and wildlife habitats. Smith discusses what is being done to eliminate this invasive plant.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Holiday 2004, p24-26, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7738
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Beach vitex was introduced into the southeastern United States from Korea in the 1980s. Scientists believed the plant could help stabilize sand dunes. Beach vitex now grows as far north as Ocracoke Island and as far south as Florida and Alabama. Heavy concentrations are also found on Bogue Banks, Bald Head Island, and Oak Island. Experts in North Carolina are seeking to have the plant listed as a Federal Noxious Weed. North and South Carolina's two-state task force has worked to stop the plant's spread.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Spring 2006, p26-29, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8195
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The authors discuss a red alga that has recently invaded the coastal waters of North Carolina. It has become abundant in the sounds and estuaries of the southeastern section of the state and is a nuisance for commercial fishing operations and industries drawing water from the lower Cape Fear River. Seasonal growth of the plant was studied at times of coldest and warmest air and water temperatures.
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Record #:
8895
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A humorous article, Pearce argues that kudzu was developed by the Japanese during the Great Depression to take over the United States.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 8, Jan 1984, p12-13, por
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Record #:
12960
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Exotic plants are taking over many of the state's ecosystems. The invaders crowd out native vegetation and wildlife habitats, and in some areas hamper commercial and recreational fishing. Smith describes some of the common invaders and attempts to eradicate them.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Autumn 2010, p16-19, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
13782
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Hydrilla, an aquatic weed, has arrived in the state's northern coastal waters. A fast-growing Asian perennial, it is coasting North Carolina millions of dollars in efforts to control it.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Winter 2011, p22-24, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
20853
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Kemp examines how non-indigenous species are endangering the natives in North Carolina and beyond. For example, flathead catfish eat native fishes or their food, hydrilla plants overtake lakes, and kudzu covers every bare spot in sight. She describes characteristics of the invaders and presents seven things individuals can do to help control them.
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North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 9 Issue 2, Fall/Win 2001, p2-8, il, por, map
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Record #:
21182
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Invasives are introduced, non-indigenous, or non-native species of plants and animals that get into local environments. Douglass explores how they arrive in the state, what effects they have on the state's ecosystem, names of some of the state's invasives, and what can be done about them.
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Record #:
22173
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Invasive plants come in many categories, from trees to grasses. Once in they can take over a landscape and push out the native plants. They can be very difficult and costly to remove. Ney suggests ways to know and grow a native landscape and keep the invasive out.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 43 Issue 0, Aug 2011, p17-18, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
25045
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An invasive species of water plant is taking over lakes and ponds in North Carolina. It’s called giant salvinia or Kariba weed. Many people were, for years, distributing it and didn’t realize the harm it could do.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Holiday 2001, p26-29, il Periodical Website
Record #:
25865
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Guava and mora are invasive plants threatening the Galapagos ecosystems. Geographer Steve Walsh is creating digital maps and models to show where invasive species are and how they might spread.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 23 Issue 2, Winter 2007, p26-27, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
9854
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Kudzu, the so-called “plant that ate the South,” was introduced in the 1930s. It can cover entire landscapes in lush, green foliage, and while it can control erosion and feed livestock, it is considered a pest. Geographically, it is limited by the fact that it does not tolerate cold weather well.
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Record #:
26959
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Hydrilla is a fast growing aquatic plant creating dense surface mats which impede water flow in canals, reduce water storage in reservoirs, and interfere with recreation and navigation. In 1980, hydrilla was found in Big Lake, located in North Carolina’s Umstead State Park. Research is currently being done to determine how to enact effective hydrilla management.
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Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 29 Issue 10, Nov/Dec 1982, p12
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Record #:
6777
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Since kudzu, the so-called “plant that ate the South,” was introduced in the 1930s, other non-native fish, animals and plants are beginning to make their presence known in North Carolina. Many of the plants are Asian in origin and include Chinese silvergrass and Chinese privet. Other invasives include hydrilla and giant salvinia. Plants spread to open lands and clog waterways. Once established, they are almost impossible to remove mechanically. Fishermen sometimes move fish from one area to another in hopes of creating a new fishery, and in so doing, often create a new problem. Jenkins discusses this problem of invasives and their affect on the composition of the state's flora and fauna over the next fifty to one hundred years.
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Record #:
27394
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The Eno River has recently become full of hydrilla verticillata, an invasive species of aquatic weed from South Asia. It grows too plentifully in North Carolina, causing rivers to become sluggish, competing with local species, decreasing oxygen levels in rivers, amongst other things. The leaders of Eno State park are looking for ways to better contain hydrilla, with some success.
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