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21 results for Angione, Kathleen
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Record #:
6935
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Muzel Bryant was born on Ocracoke on March 12, 1904. She traces her lineage on the island back to the Civil War. At the war's close in 1865, all former slaves left the island. Her grandparents were the only two African Americans to move from the mainland to Ocracoke. Bryant has lived off the island only once when she worked during her teenage years in Philadelphia. Today, at the age of 100, she is an important link to Outer Banks history.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Holiday 2004, p20-23, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
7027
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For over a century there has been a steady decline of the Eastern oyster in the Pamlico Sound. Habitat destruction, pollution, overharvesting, and disease are major factors in reducing the 1902 harvest of 1.8 million bushels to barely 49,000 in 2003. Working with satellite mapping and sonar imaging, Eugene Ballance of Ocracoke is transforming the 1886-1887 Navy survey maps of the oyster reefs in the Pamlico Sound into blueprints for restoring the Eastern oyster. The early maps were created by naval officer Lt. Francis E. Winslow, who, after retiring from the Navy, started the Pamlico Oyster Company in the late 1880s.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Winter 2004, p14-17, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
7147
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Between 1992 and 2001, in coastal waters from New Jersey to North Carolina, 210 bottlenose dolphins were killed by becoming entangled in gill nets used by fishermen. The dolphins become entangled either by accidentally running into the nets or by being caught while eating the fishing catch. Angione reports on a study funded by the North Carolina Fishery Resource Grant program to study whether acoustic alarms can keep the dolphins away from the gill nets.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Spring 2005, p24-26, il Periodical Website
Record #:
7340
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Bycatch is a hotly debated topic among fishermen involved in inshore shrimping, individuals, and state agencies. Bycatch is the amount of non-targeted catch that fishermen net along with their intended catch. Inshore shrimping nets can scoop up valuable commercial and recreational fish, such as croaker, spot, gray trout, and flounder. If large numbers of these fish end up as bycatch, their populations will decline and affect sportsfishermen and other commercial fisheries. A North Carolina Fishery Resource Grant project assesses the bycatch generated in North Carolina's southeastern shrimp fisheries.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Early Summer 2005, p16-19, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
7486
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Roanoke Island is synonymous with the Lost Colony of the 1580s. A second colony flourished there during the Civil War. This one was composed of slaves who sought refuge behind the lines of Union soldiers, who occupied a portion of the eastern part of the state. By 1864, ex-slaves on the island numbered 2,700. Freedmen's Colony was a thriving community with churches, schools, and homes. Angione explores the history of this colony and how it is commemorated today.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Holiday 2005, p24-27, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7719
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In 1987, Lee Brothers of Aurora became the first person in the country to pond-raise hybrid sea bass commercially. The fish, a cross between a striped bass and a white bass, generates around $7 million annually in the state. Hybrids are popular in sushi and sashimi markets in the Northeast. North Carolina now has nineteen hybrid producers, the most in the United States. Beaufort County has five of the nineteen fish farms. As coastal development pushes into areas where the fish are raised, farmers face public pressure about releasing effluent from their ponds into streams and rivers.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Winter 2006, p10-13, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7718
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Stormwater runoff is a major pollution problem for shellfish farms. Home construction in coastal areas is growing. More people mean more roads, driveways, and parking lots. Water running over these impervious surfaces picks up contaminants such as oil, sand, chemicals, and fertilizers and deposits them in nearby rivers and streams. The more contaminants the harder it is for shellfish to grow. Reconciling the demand for development and the need for healthy shellfish is a challenge facing coastal planners.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Winter 2006, p6-9, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7738
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Beach vitex was introduced into the southeastern United States from Korea in the 1980s. Scientists believed the plant could help stabilize sand dunes. Beach vitex now grows as far north as Ocracoke Island and as far south as Florida and Alabama. Heavy concentrations are also found on Bogue Banks, Bald Head Island, and Oak Island. Experts in North Carolina are seeking to have the plant listed as a Federal Noxious Weed. North and South Carolina's two-state task force has worked to stop the plant's spread.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Spring 2006, p26-29, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7908
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Shackleford Banks, part of the Cape Lookout National Seashore, is a 3,000-acre uninhabited island near Atlantic Beach. A herd of 112 wild horses lives there, one of only a few wild herds remaining in the country. The herd's reproductive rate is carefully controlled to keep the horses from putting a strain on the island's food and water resources. To understand how the horses thrive and survive in the island's harsh environment, the National Park Service has undertaken a study of the horses' eating habits. The study will look at seasonal eating habits and whether different habitats provide different nutritional contents. No findings have been reported as yet, and the study will take another year to complete.
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Record #:
8026
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In 2005, around twelve million people visited North Carolina's coastal region. Many coastal visitors come by car and have difficulty finding places to park. State and federal parks usually have large parking facilities, but some coastal communities struggle to accommodate visitors. Public access and parking issues among North Carolina's coastal communities are examined.
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Record #:
8190
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For more than thirty years Sea Grant has emphasized solid, peer-reviewed scientific research that can be applied to the real-world problems and issues facing North Carolina's coasts. Angione highlights some of the research projects that include aquaculture, ecosystems and habitats, and seafood science and technology.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Autumn 2006, p18-21, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8531
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Shrimp is one of the most popular seafood products in the country, but what most Americans do not realize is that 90 percent of the shrimp they are eating is imported. Over half of the imports are raised in ponds in Asia and South American and not caught in the wild. This has put the American shrimp industry at a disadvantage in trying to compete with the cheaper imports. Angione explores 'Wild American Shrimp,' a new marking effort of Wild American Shrimp, Inc. (WASI), the marketing arm of the Southern Shrimp Alliance (SSA), which seeks to promote the quality of American shrimp.
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Record #:
9007
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Walter Clark, who served as the North Carolina Sea Grant's coastal law, planning and policy specialist for over two decades, retired in January 2007. Angione discusses how Clark's career with Sea Grant helped to shape coastal policy.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Early Summer 2007, p17-22, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
9208
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Angione discusses the economic, environmental, and cultural revitalization going on in Washington, North Carolina. Main Street is home to a variety of shops, from furniture to art galleries, and restaurants offer specialties to satisfy a variety of palates. The waterfront has had a facelift, and the old railroad depot is now the town's civic center.
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Record #:
9595
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Angione reports on a new study conducted by the University of North Carolina at Greensboro that makes a connection between bats and the water quality in the state's river and streams.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Autumn 2007, p6-11, il Periodical Website
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