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7 results for Beaches--Access roads
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Record #:
8026
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In 2005, around twelve million people visited North Carolina's coastal region. Many coastal visitors come by car and have difficulty finding places to park. State and federal parks usually have large parking facilities, but some coastal communities struggle to accommodate visitors. Public access and parking issues among North Carolina's coastal communities are examined.
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Record #:
8793
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The North Carolina General Assembly passed legislation in 2006 establishing the North Carolina Waterfront Access Study Committee. Access to water along the state's coastline is a hot topic, because piers, boat ramps, and other access points are being sold to developers. Getting to the water is becoming more difficult for the average citizen. The committee has held meetings in Manteo, Morehead City, and Wilmington, and 275 people have attended. Mosher discusses concerns and suggestions citizens offered to the committee.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Spring 2007, p6-10, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
9008
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The North Carolina General Assembly passed legislation in 2006 establishing the North Carolina Waterfront Access Study Committee. Access to water along the state's coastline is a hot topic, because piers, boat ramps, and other access points are being sold to developers. Getting to the water is becoming more difficult for the average citizen. The twenty-one-member committee offers twenty-seven recommendations in this executive summary, excerpted from the full report.
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Record #:
9736
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina General Assembly passed legislation in 2006 establishing the North Carolina Waterfront Access Study Committee. Access to water along the state's coastline is a hot topic, because piers, boat ramps, and other access points are being sold to developers. Getting to the water is becoming more difficult for the average citizen. Mosher reports on action taken by the 2007 General Assembly in response to the recommendations from the study commission.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Autumn 2007, p22-23, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
13076
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Estimated to cost upwards of $1.25 million dollars, two new bridges, and a causeway leading to Harbor Island and Wrightsville Beach, is expected to reduce traffic by 50%. McMeekin Construction Company, Atkinson Dredging, and the Wilson Construction Company, will complete the new project.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 24 Issue 20, Feb 1957, p39-40, il
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Record #:
13467
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Containing photos from 1936 through the 1950s, this article discusses roadway improvements on the Outer Banks. Including information relative to sites along the way, Bill Sharpe revisits the various phases of transportation support extended to these offshore islands.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 20 Issue 6, July 1952, p3-5, 19, il
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Record #:
13465
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Increased beach traffic in North Carolina is leading to new roads, bridges, fishing piers, and general development. New roadside parks and other attractions are meant to divert beachgoers and augment local concessions.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 20 Issue 4, June 1952, p14-17, il
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